Jan 25, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Finance

  
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    FIN 3010 - Financial Markets and Institutions



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2010 with a grade of "C" or better, ECO 2010, ECO 2020 and At least junior standing

    Description: This course provides a framework for understanding our financial environment, including markets, institutions, and securities. Each type of market and how financial institutions use it, its internationalization, and recent events that have affected it, are studied.

  
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    FIN 3100 - International Money and Finance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ECO 2010, ECO 2020 and At least junior standing

    Description: This course covers the basics of the foreign exchange market, the balance of payments, parity conditions in international finance, foreign exchange risk and forecasting, the financing of international activities, and international capital flows. The course will focus on the financial management of the multinational firm.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: FIN or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3103
  
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    FIN 3150 - Personal Financial Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Business major or minor with at least junior standing

    Description: This course is an introduction to the field of personal financial planning for business students. The student will study money management, investments, insurance, employee benefits, retirement planning, and estate planning, as they relate to individual and family financial planning.

    Note: Credit will be granted only for FIN 2250 or FIN 3150. Business students should take FIN 3150.

  
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    FIN 3300 - Managerial Finance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy requirements; ACC 2010; MTH 1320 or MTH 1410 with a grade of "C-" or better; ECO 2010, ECO 2020, and at least junior standing.

    Description: This is a study of the dynamic environment of financial management, exposing students to various finance topics such as financial analysis and forecasting, time value money, security valuation, capital budgeting, risk and return, cost of capital, working capital management and international finance.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: FIN or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3302
  
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    FIN 3320 - Entrepreneurial Finance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing

    Description: The course is designed to acquaint students with the basic concepts of obtaining funds for the start-up and financing the continued growth of the firm. The course covers start-up financing, growth capital, daily financial management, valuation, and strategic financial planning.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: FIN or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3321
  
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    FIN 3420 - Principles of Insurance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing

    Description: This course explores the underlying principles of insurance, and the need for insurance in a progressive, dynamic society. It includes an introductory examination of insurable risks, uses of insurance, as well as a study of the important coverages that are currently available.

  
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    FIN 3450 - Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing

    Description: This is a study of the principles of retirement planning and employee benefits, including the determination of financial needs at retirement. The various employee benefits and retirement plans for employees and self-employed persons will be studied.

  
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    FIN 3600 - Investments



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3300 with a grade of "C" or better and At least junior standing

    Description: This course is a survey of the organization and regulation of security markets; security analysis and valuation; and principles of portfolio management from the viewpoint of the individual investor.

  
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    FIN 3800 - Real Estate Practice and Law



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing

    Description: This course surveys the principles and practices of real estate. Subject areas treated include the nature and description of real estate, real property interests and ownership, finance, appraisal, contract and agency law, and real estate investment.

  
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    FIN 3810 - Advanced Real Estate Practice and Law



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FIN 3800 and junior or senior standing

    Description: This course builds upon the material covered in FIN 3800 by providing expanded, in-depth coverage of the topics as well as introducing some new topics to provide a broad coverage of the field of Real Estate and to prepare the student for licensing examinations.

  
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    FIN 3850 - Intermediate Finance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3300 with a grade of "C" or better, and At least junior standing

    Description: This is an advanced, integrated study of investment risks and returns, the development of modern portfolio theory, financial statements, capital budgeting, and working capital issues. Use of financial calculators and Excel spreadsheets is required to analyze financial problems.

  
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    FIN 3980 - Internship in Finance



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): Major in Finance; junior or senior status; permission of instructor

    Description: Supervised by a faculty member within the major department, internships provide practical, hands-on experience in a professional field related to the major. Internship placements must be established prior to enrollment in this course in consultation with the Applied Learning Center.

    To register with the Applied Learning Center, students must meet the following qualifications:

    • Completed at least one semester at MSU Denver
    • Sophomore, junior or senior status
    • Declared major in an undergraduate program
    • 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA at MSU Denver
    • Currently enrolled and taking classes at MSU Denver

    For information and instructions on finding and enrolling in an internship, contact the Applied Learning Center at 303-556-3290 or internships@msudenver.edu.

    Note: Variable Credit

  
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    FIN 4200 - Financial Modeling with Spreadsheets



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3300, FIN 3600, and FIN 3850 (all with a grade of "C" or better), CIS 2010 and senior standing

    Description: This course provides the student with a strong set of financial analysis skills to use in building complex financial models utilizing electronic spreadsheets. The topics covered include building financial statements, analysis of financial statements, modern portfolio theory, capital budgeting, regression analysis, and both linear and nonlinear programming for financial applications.

  
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    FIN 4400 - Estate Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Business major or minor with At least junior standing

    Description: The course provides the student with the basic concepts of estate planning and importance in overall financial planning. The course covers the tools and techniques of estate planning so as to arrange the efficient future wealth transfers to maximize the financial well being of both the individual and recipients of the wealth transfer.

  
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    FIN 4500 - Analysis of Financial Statements



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3850 with a grade of "C" or better and Senior standing

    Description: An in-depth study of current financial reporting practices, analysis and interpretation of corporate financial statements, utilizing text and selected cases.

  
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    FIN 4600 - Security Analysis and Portfolio Management



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3600, FIN 3850 with a grade of "C" or better in both and Senior standing

    Description: This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of security analysis and portfolio management. The focus of the course is on selecting the appropriate securities and managing the portfolio to meet the investor objectives. This is the capstone and assessment course for finance majors with a concentration in financial services.

  
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    FIN 4700 - Special Topics in Finance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and approval of the Finance Department chair

    Description: This is an in-depth study of selected topics in finance not available otherwise in the curriculum. Typically, this course will focus on current issues or developments in finance, and the content will vary.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

  
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    FIN 4750 - Seminar in Personal Financial Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3420, FIN 3450, FIN 3600, FIN 4400 and ACC 3090

    Description: This is a senior-level integrative course for finance majors concentrating in personal financial planning. It brings together the various aspects of financial planning with heavy emphasis on case studies.

  
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    FIN 4950 - Financial Strategies and Policies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3600, FIN 3850 with a grade of "C" or better in both, Senior standing, and completion of all business core courses except MGT 4950

    Description: This course takes an integrated case study approach to financial management. Emphasis is on presentation of analyses and recommendations for strategies and policies. This is the capstone and assessment course for finance majors with a concentration in general finance. Proficiency in personal computer and word processing and spreadsheet applications is necessary.


Fire and Emergency Services

  
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    FER 3000 - Applications of Fire Research



    Credits: 3

    Description: In this course, students will examine the basic principles of research and methodology for analyzing current, fire-related research. Students will also be introduced to an applications framework for conducting and evaluating independent research in the following areas: fire dynamics, fire test standards and codes, fire safety, fire modeling, structural fire safety, life safety, firefighter health and safety, automatic detection and suppression, transportation fire hazards, risk analysis and loss control, fire service applied research, and new trends in fire-related research.

  
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    FER 3110 - Community Risk Reduction for Fire and Emergency Services



    Credits: 3

    Description: Students will be introduced to a theoretical framework for understanding the ethical, sociological, organizational, political, and legal components of community risk reduction and a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan.

  
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    FER 3140 - Fire and Emergency Services Administration



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services administration. Students will examine the following skills necessary to manage and lead a fire and emergency services department through the challenges and changes of the 21st century: Persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges and the need for change, and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department's mission.

  
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    FER 3200 - Fire Prevention, Organization, and Management



    Credits: 3

    Description: In this course, students will examine the factors that shape fire risk and the tools for fire prevention, including risk reduction education, codes and standards, inspection and plans review, fire investigation, research, master planning, various types of influences, and strategies. Also, students will examine the changing roles and responsibilities of fire prevention professionals in  managing fire prevention programs and risk reduction activities to ensure public safety.

  
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    FER 3430 - Personnel Development for Fire and Emergency Services



    Credits: 3

    Description: In this course, students will examine relationships and issues in personnel administration and human resource management within the context of fire and emergency service organizations, including personnel management, organizational development, productivity, recruitment and selection, performance management systems, discipline, and collective bargaining.

  
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    FER 3460 - Political and Legal Foundations for Fire Protection



    Credits: 3

    Description: In this course, students will examine the legal aspects of the fire service and the political and social impacts of legal issues. The course includes a review of the American legal system and in-depth coverage of legal and political issues involving employment and personnel matters, administrative and operational matters, planning and code enforcement, and legislative and political processes with regard to the fire service. At the end of the course students will be able to understand how fire and emergency services administrators perform as effective risk managers by recognizing legal and political issues affecting public safety, and finding and applying appropriate legal rules and/or political constructs as indicated.

  
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    FER 3911 - Cultural Competence for First Responders



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies Written Communication Requirement; FER 3430

    Description: Students in this course examine first responder roles in society in relation to social power, class structure, ecological patterns, subcultural developments, and processes of change in the community and in the larger culture. Culture is examined in order to comprehend the interaction between subcultures in the larger society, as well as develop an understanding of cultural competence applications for first responders. Students in this course evaluate the ambivalence in the social processes of first responders, and the challenges inherent in the profession.

  
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    FER 3980 - Internship: Fire and Emergency Response



    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite(s): FER 3430

    Description: Students in this course gain an internship experience in a fire and/or emergency services management setting where students are able to use the skills learned in the classroom in a supervised, professional realm. Students work as fire and emergency management practitioners in a variety of public and private outlets.

    Note: This course is repeatable up to 6 semester hours.

  
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    FER 4100 - Analytical Approaches to Public Fire Protection



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: In this course, students apply the tools and techniques of rational decision making in Fire and Emergency Services agencies. Students learn and apply data collection, statistics, probability, decision analysis, utility modeling, resource allocation, and cost-benefit analysis for fire and emergency services.

  
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    FER 4220 - Fire Dynamics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: In this course, students examine the principles of fire and combustion, including the chemistry and physics of fire, ignition, flame spread and smoke movement related to fire compartments. Students apply instruction to fire service, other fire safety practitioners, which includes special hazards, mathematical fire modeling and explosions (Service Learning).

    Note: (Service Learning Designation added July 13, 2017)

  
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    FER 4260 - Fire Investigation and Analysis



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: In this course, students analyze the technical, investigative, legal, and social aspects of arson, including principles of incendiary fire analysis and detection, environmental and psychological factors of arson, legal considerations, intervention, and mitigation strategies.

  
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    FER 4310 - Fire Protection Structures and Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: Students examine the underlying principles involved in structural fire protections systems, building furnishings, and fire protection systems, including water-based fire suppression systems, fire alarm and detection systems, special hazard suppression systems, and smoke management systems (Service Learning).

    Note: (Service Learning Designation added July 13, 2017)

  
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    FER 4420 - Fire-related Human Behavior



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: Students in this course gain a fundamental understanding of how humans respond to fire and how this understanding has been integrated into the design and development of life safety systems. Students examine current and past research on human behavior, systems models, life safety education, and building design to determine interactions of these areas in emergency situations. Students develop an understanding of a best practice for building life safety systems as one that combines knowledge in the areas of psychology and sociology joined with engineering and education to produce the best possible outcomes in terms of human survivability in an emergency.

  
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    FER 4510 - Managerial Issues in Hazardous Materials



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: In this course, students analyze current issues in management of a department-wide hazardous materials program and explain issues that are pertinent to officers and managers in public safety departments, including regulations and requirements for hazardous materials preparedness, response, storage, transportation, handling and use, and the emergency response to terrorism threat/incident. Other class topics include state, local, and federal emergency response planning, personnel and training, and operational considerations, such as determining strategic goals and tactical objectives.

  
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    FER 4610 - Disaster Planning and Control



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Meets General Studies requirement for written communication

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FER 3140

    Description: Students examine concepts and principles of community risk assessment, planning, and response to fires, natural and man-made disasters, including National Institute Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS), mutual aid and automatic response, training and preparedness, communications, civil disturbances, terrorist threats/incidents, hazardous materials planning, mass casualty incidents, earthquake preparedness, and disaster mitigation and recovery.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: FER or HCM.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

    Cross Listed Course(s): HCM 4161

French

  
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    FRE 1010 - Elementary French I



    Credits: 5

    Description: This course focuses on skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and cultural competency.

  
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    FRE 1020 - Elementary French II



    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 1010 or one year of high school French or its equivalent with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course is a continuation of FRE 1010 and focuses on skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and cultural competency.

    Note: This course requires a grade of "C" or better to fulfill the General Studies requirement.

    General Studies: Oral Communication

  
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    FRE 1800 - International French Year I



    Credits: 1-15

    Description: This is a variable-credit course, designed for first-year students learning French in a study abroad setting. Recognizes approved study-abroad educational experience in French speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing.

  
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    FRE 2010 - Intermediate French I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 1020 or equivalent

    Description: This course is the first of a two-semester, integrated, second-year sequence. The course focuses on further skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and on cultural competency. Class is conducted mostly in French and will include a variety of interactive activities designed to help students develop their knowledge of French and their ability to use it productively in situations of communication.

  
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    FRE 2020 - Intermediate French II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 2010 or equivalent

    Description: This course is a continuation of FRE 2010 and is the second of a two-semester, integrated, second-year sequence. The course focuses on further skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and on cultural competency. Class is conducted mostly in French and will include a variety of interactive activities designed to help students develop their knowledge of French and their ability to use it productively in situations of communication.

  
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    FRE 2110 - French Reading and Conversation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): One year of college French or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course helps to build oral proficiency at intermediate and advanced levels through a variety of personalized interactional activities that are based on readings appropriate to each stage of linguistic development.

  
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    FRE 2800 - International French Year II



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): One year of college French or equivalent

    Description: This is a variable-credit course that recognizes second-year study of French language and culture in an approved study-abroad setting.

  
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    FRE 3010 - French as a Global Language



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 2010, FRE 2020, or departmental permission

    Description: This transitional course is designed to develop those critical, linguistic, and analytical skills required to pursue French studies at the advanced level. The cultural sources studied-literary texts, films, news articles, videos, audio programs,etc.-are chosen to acquaint students with Francophone socio-cultural and literary issues.

  
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    FRE 3050 - Cultural Crossroads: France, Germany, Spain



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: This course gives students the cultural background necessary to understand and appreciate those spiritual and intellectual developments that have given today's three European nations (representing our language disciplines) their characteristics. Main topics include the Indo- European language family, the cultural and technological development of Germanic and Romance-speaking countries, the causes for the rise and fall of these countries throughout the 2000 years under consideration, the role of women in politics and the arts, the development of differing social etiquette, reasons for mass emigrations, and contributions of immigrants to their new countries, and the effect that the European Union has on the educational social welfare of its member nations.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Cross Listed Course(s): GER 3050, HON 3050, MDL 3050, SPA 3050
  
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    FRE 3110 - Survey of French Literature I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010 or permission of instructor; and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This introduction to French literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment gives an insight into French literary, historical, and cultural development through selected reading and discussion.

  
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    FRE 3120 - Survey of French Literature II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010 or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This introduction to 19th- and 20th-century French literature emphasizes the evolution of literary style and content from Romanticism to contemporary literary schools. Readings and discussion are in French.

  
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    FRE 3150 - French Phonetics: Theory and Practice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of college French or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the essential facts of French phonology. It is aimed at improving students' pronunciation and articulation and introducing them to the field of linguistics.

  
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    FRE 3310 - Advanced French Composition and Grammar



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 2010, FRE 2020 or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to reinforce and further develop writing skills, thus enabling the student to combine accuracy with imagination and inventiveness in writing French.

  
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    FRE 3320 - Cinema in French for Advanced Conversation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010 or Senior Standing or Instructor's Permission

    Description: This course explores French-language films and provides a vehicle for advanced-level French language comprehension and expression. While students receive an enriched understanding of contemporary French culture, they are encouraged to use advanced structures of the language, as well as other aspects of grammar and idiomatic expressions.

  
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    FRE 3550 - French Historical Perspectives



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010 or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This survey chronologically presents major political, societal, and cultural movements that have molded France and the French throughout history.

  
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    FRE 3560 - Contemporary Socio-Cultural Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3010 or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course provides in-depth presentations and analysis of recent social, cultural, political, and economic issues important to an understanding of contemporary France.

  
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    FRE 3800 - International Advanced French



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): At least junior standing in French or equivalent

    Description: This course recognizes upper-division study in language, culture, and literature in a study abroad setting. It uses a variety of methods and includes reading, writing, and discussion seminars in French.

  
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    FRE 4520 - Modern French Theater



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Three years of college French or equivalent, or Permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements; and senior standing.

    Description: This is a sampling of the French dramatists who have not only contributed to literary development, but who also have had an impact on society and culture. Theater analysis techniques will also be stressed.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    FRE 4530 - The French Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Three years of college French or equivalent, or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements; and senior standing.

    Description: This is a sampling of 19th- and 20th-century French novels that will be studied in depth using several literary analysis techniques.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    FRE 4540 - Literature, Culture, and Translation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 3310 and/or Senior standing or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to allow students to use the various skills that they have developed during their studies of French language, culture and literature at an advanced level. Students analyze and apply translation techniques (from both French to English and English to French) and demonstrate an ability to analyze cultural differences that affect translation, both of text and image. The course provides a practical application of skills toward a service-leaming translation project and includes reflection on the service learning process. Enrollment is limited to 15 students. (Service Learning)

  
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    FRE 4750 - Senior Seminar in French Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, at least two courses at the FRE 3000-level

    Description: This is an intense thematic seminar on either a literary or cultural topic emphasizing a comparative study in the former and a multidisciplinary approach to the latter.


Gender, Women and Sexualities

  
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    GWS 1001 - Introduction to Women's Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing and mathematics preassessment tests

    Description: This course introduces the discipline of women's studies, the historical development of feminist thought, the intersectionality of identities, including gender, race, class, and sexual orientation, and the social, economic, and technological factors that have led to changing roles for women throughout the world. The course also focuses analysis on gender, race and class, including experiences of women of color.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

  
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    GWS 1200 - Multicultural Study of Sexualities and Genders



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1020

    Description: This multidisciplinary course introduces the study of sexualities and genders including the history, major theories, racial intersections, and issues.  Foundational concepts and vocabulary are taught so that the student will be equipped to take advanced courses in this area.  General models of identity linked with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender sexualities are explored.  Intersectional analysis will be applied with particular attention to the experiences of sexuality and gender in the Native American/Indigenous, African-American, Chicana/o, and Asian American communities.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    GWS 1550 - Introduction to Transgender Studies



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course explores the transgender and transsexual experience, focusing on Western cultural definitions and concepts. The course covers transgender basics, including definitions and language; the history of the transgender movement; the legal, social, and medical aspects of transition; current political issues within and for the movement; cultural aspects of gender diversity; well-known trans people in Western culture; working with transgender and transsexual populations; and being a good ally and advocate. By the end of the course, students will have the language, knowledge, and skills to work with transgender and transsexual populations in a variety of settings and will understand the diversity of the transgender experience.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

  
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    GWS 1600 - Women in World History



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing pre-assessment placement tests

    Description: This course will explore the role, experiences, and contributions of women in the family, the economy, the culture, the religions and the political structure from a broad, comparative framework. Students will become familiar with how women's history modifies the traditional interpretations of historical events.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: HIS or GWS.

    General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 1600
  
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    GWS 2010 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods in Social Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of methods, analyses and critiques used by scholars to study social issues within and across a range of disciplines (e.g., history, arts, humanities, sciences, education, health, economics, law and social/ behavioral sciences). Research designs and general statistical interpretation will be reviewed for each methodology. Techniques for laboratory and field research, conducting qualitative and quantitative studies, and writing research reports will also be included.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or AAS or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 2010, CHS 2030
  
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    GWS 2100 - Women of Color



    Credits: 3

    Description: Though U.S. women share much in common, their differences are salient to a thorough understanding of all these women's experiences. Comparative analysis of women's race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation are central to this course. The similarities among diverse groups of women are also examined in order to better understand the complexity of women's lives. The course addresses issues of work, health, interpersonal violence, globalization, as well as resistance, activism, and social change across identities.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, CHS, or GWS.

    (Course revised July 13, 2017)


    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 2100, CHS 2100
  
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    GWS 2380 - Women, Art and Gender Politics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or ARTH 1500 or ARTH 1600 or ARTH 1700

    Description: This course surveys visual art production by women over a broad span of time and geographies and examines the roles that gender and gender politics have taken throughout art history. Topics include the differing roles and status that women have obtained as artists in western culture, access to artistic training, representations of women and constructs of femininity in western art, and comparative models in selected non-western cultures. Work by women throughout various waves of feminisms will also be addressed, and a range of gender frameworks will be introduced in order to interpret visual art.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or GWS

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 2380
  
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    GWS 2400 - Women's Folklore



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course provides an exploration of folklore in everyday life, including folk narrative and other verbal genres, as well as material forms and other manifestations of traditional expressive behavior, as it pertains to reinforcing and resisting gender identity and norms. This course focuses on the centrality and pervasiveness of creativity, developing a contextual approach to understanding aesthetic expression.

    Note: Credit will be granted for one prefix only: ANT or GWS.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Cross Listed Course(s): ANT 2400
  
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    GWS 2770 - Gender and Communication



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1710 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores the relationship of gender to the communication process by examining issues of power, conflict, sex role stereotypes, and cultural patterns of interaction on relationships and identity. Students explore the multiple ways that masculinity and femininity are created and sustained through communication in such contexts as families, schools, the workplace, and the media. Students will use feminist theoretical perspectives and interpretive approaches from communication studies to analyze cultural assumptions and the relationships of notions of gender to class, sexuality and race.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CAS or GWS.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Cross Listed Course(s): CAS 2770
  
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    GWS 3050 - Psychology of Gender



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1001 or GWS 1001

    Description: This course presents a survey of major contemporary approaches to gender, including a range of scientific and theoretical work. A constructionist approach is utilized to synthesize the views. The course then reviews several major areas of application, including relationships, health, violence, workplace, and achievements.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: PSY or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSY 3050
  
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    GWS 3070 - Psychology of Sexual Orientation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1001; 6 additional hours of psychology or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores psychological theory and research dealing with sexual orientation, with an emphasis on lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) identity. Topics include historical and theoretical frameworks, homophobia and heterosexism, origins of sexual orientation, LGB identity development and coming out, diversity, relationships and parenting, the role of community, and others.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or PSY.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSY 3070
  
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    GWS 3130 - Readings in Women's Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 and ENG 1020; or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course permits the student to develop an in-depth knowledge of the materials and information in the discipline of women's studies. Through the selections read, students will learn the theory, history, and scope of the literature in the field. This course offers individualized instruction and personal consultation with faculty.

  
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    GWS 3170 - Social Justice, Self, and Citizenship: A Service Learning Course



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or PSY 1001 and six additional semester hours in Women's Studies or six additional semester hours in Psychology

    Description: Social justice encompasses research, activism and current events about manifestations of social oppression and social change. This course focuses upon psychological theory and self-identity in the context of multicultural and social justice issues (e.g., classism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, and ableism). Lectures, readings, and discussions are integrated with a required service learning placement involving 30 hours of volunteer work in a setting for the underserved. Students have the opportunity to a) reflect on their values, assumptions, place within, and emotional reactions to social oppressions; b) analyze the political systems that surround their communities and institutions; and c) apply their reflections to their career goals and personal development.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: HON, PSY, or GWS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3170, PSY 3170
  
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    GWS 3180 - Feminist Philosophy



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PHI 1010 or 1030 and junior standing are recommended

    Description: This course involves an examination of traditional philosophical topics and questions from the perspective of contemporary feminist theory. Special consideration is given to feminist critiques of logic, rationality and scientific objectivity and to feminist approaches to ethical, social and political thought.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: PHI or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PHI 3180
  
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    GWS 3220 - Prejudice and Discrimination in Contemporary Society



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010, GWS 1001, or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course examines the origins and characteristics of peace, racism, gender biases and ethnic prejudices; the social, psychological and cultural courses of discrimination and bias; and implications in current societal structures and institutions.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, SOC or GWS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 3220, SOC 3220
  
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    GWS 3230 - Bodies and Embodiment



    Credits: 3

    Description: Students in this course examine multiple interdisciplinary discourses about gendered, sexed, raced, classed, and able bodies, beginning with Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex. Through discussion, lecture and critical evaluation of key theories in Body and Embodiment Studies (by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Susan Bordo, bell hooks, and Iris M. Young) students in this course explore the inscribed, as well as the lived, body--bodies that are gazed at, desired, fashioned, heard, and eroticized. In order to historically situate these discourses, the body is presented as a social construct that is controlled and manipulated but that also has unique experiences which cannot be verbalized and/or managed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ITP, SOC, or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ITP 3230, SOC 3230
  
  •  

    GWS 3240 - American Indian Women



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or NAS 1000 Recommended

    Description: This course is designed to expose the student to the diverse and varied works of American Indian women. By studying the literature, music, and dance of the American Indian woman, students explore the historical factors that have impacted the lives of both American Indians and non-native people. This course also examines the transition that American Indian women have made in order to survive and attempt to understand their struggles for freedom.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: NAS or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): NAS 3240
  
  •  

    GWS 3250 - Black Women Writers



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or ENG 1020

    Description: The course studies selected works chosen as representative of the issues and concerns of Black women worldwide as voiced by Black women writers from Africa and the Diaspora.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, HON, or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 3250, HON 3250
  
  •  

    GWS 3260 - Gender, Social Justice and the Personal Narrative



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: This course explores personal narrative as a vehicle for discovery and dissemination of social justice themes as they connect to the lived experiences of the authors. Students take part both as readers and authors, narrating excerpts from their own lives as they relate to social justice themes.

    University Requirement(s): Arts and Humanities

  
  •  

    GWS 3270 - Beauty Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: This course explores contemporary and historical beauty cultures (both in the U.S. and in a global context), their critiques, and their impact on the lived experience of individuals, including students enrolled in the course. Students discern and untangle the interplay between individual aesthetic impulses and larger cultural and structural forces as they pertain to the beautification of the human face and body.

    University Requirement(s): Arts and Humanities, Global Diversity

  
  •  

    GWS 3280 - Queer Theory



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or GWS 1200

    Description: This course surveys a broad array of scholarship in queer theory, as well as applications of queer theory in a variety of academic fields to explore practices, identities, and communities as well as the cultural construction of gender and sexuality.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: SOC or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3280
  
  •  

    GWS 3300 - Women's Leadership



    Credits: 2

    Description: This course will examine the various roles, models, and guiding principles of women in leadership. The discussions will be intentionally interactive as students share their own experience of women's leadership ranging from traditional to unconventional. Students will identify the values most clearly associated with women's leadership crossculturally and read diverse women's experiences in their communities. Each student will interview a woman whom they deem to be in a leadership role, though not necessarily a formal position, and will present his or her findings to the class. All class members will reflect on their own leadership values in relation to the course material.

    Note: Credit will be granted under one prefix only: CPD or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CPD 3300
  
  •  

    GWS 3310 - Women and the Law



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: An examination of women's legal rights under the American legal system and Colorado law. This course deals with family law, Equal Employment Opportunity Acts, housing, credit and finance, welfare, social security, abortion, prostitution, rape, and the ERA.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CJC, PSC, SOC, and GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CJC 3710, PSC 3710, SOC 3710
  
  •  

    GWS 3350 - Gender and Society



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010 or GWS 1001; or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores social, political and economic trends affecting the role of women and men in society. The emphasis is on the historical, social and cultural forces that have contributed to the social construction of gender in the United States and in other societies. The effects on individuals and the broader society in terms of maintaining and/or changing gender expectations are analyzed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: SOC or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3430
  
  •  

    GWS 3360 - Women in European History



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an historical analysis of the role and contribution made by women in the development of Western civilization from Neolithic times to the present.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3360
  
  •  

    GWS 3420 - Women and the Humanities: Variable Topics



    Credits: 2-3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: These courses focus on women in relation to the humanities under such titles as: Concepts about Women in Western Civilization; Feminist Creativity; Rediscovered Women Writers; and Feminist Ethics. Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings.

    Note: This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics.

  
  •  

    GWS 3430 - LGBT Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or GWS 1200

    Description: Students read, analyze, and write about various forms of literature produced by and about the LBGT experience with consideration of historical and social contexts. Course content includes important LBGT writers in a variety of literary periods and cultures, critical readings on LGBT history and pertinent theory, and explore how historical contingencies and political debates inform literature, as well as how literature and culture inform and challenge public and political opinion.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3360
  
  •  

    GWS 3440 - Women and the Natural Sciences: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: Women and the Natural Sciences covers such topics as Women's Biology; History of Women in Science; and Women and Geography. Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings.

    Note: This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics.

  
  •  

    GWS 3450 - Women and the Arts: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: These courses focus on women in relation to the arts and covers such topics as Woman as Muse; Women Artists; Women Composers/Conductors/ Performers; Women in Theatre; Women and Film; Women Subjects in Art. Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings.

    Note: This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics.

  
  •  

    GWS 3460 - Women and the Social Sciences: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001, SOC 1010, or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: These courses focus on women in relation to the social sciences under such titles as: Women and the Family; Women and Addictions; Women in the Criminal Justice System; Domestic Violence; Cross-Cultural Roles of Women; Women and Politics. Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings.

    Note: This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics.

  
  •  

    GWS 3470 - Biology of Women



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1000 or GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: An examination of the anatomy and physiology of sex in humans, the mechanisms involved in formation of sex and gender, and the interactions between science, society, and medical practice with regard to issues of sex and gender.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: BIO or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): BIO 3471
  
  •  

    GWS 3490 - Queer Sexualities and Identity



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020, SOC 1010, or GWS 1200; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores the various ways in which gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, and queer individuals represent themselves vis-a-vis the social construction of identity and resistance. The course analyzes the general strategies LGBTQ individuals (and their communities) utilize to self-identify their gender. Issues of queer social presentation and performance are addressed. Intersections between queer identity and issues of race, ethnicity, and class are investigated. Power and privilege embedded within the LGBTQ visual identity and social control issues are also analyzed.

    Note: Credit will be granted under one prefix only: GWS or SOC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3490
  
  •  

    GWS 3500 - Foundations for Social Work with Gays and Lesbians



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 1010, SWK 1020 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores concepts and methods useful in assessing and addressing the strengths, status, developmental needs, and social issues of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. Relationships to families, groups, organizations, community and culture are explored and examined. Concepts of diversity and conflicts within this population-at-risk in both urban and rural settings will be presented. Issues of empowerment, support, equality, social justice, social policy and practice will be reviewed and discussed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or SWK.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SWK 3500
  
  •  

    GWS 3510 - Feminist Theories and Practices I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001, GWS 2100, and 6 additional hours of upper-division, GWS coursework; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course studies both the classical tradition of feminist thought and contemporary expressions of feminist theories and issues in the Western world. The course analyzes traditional theories of human nature and "woman's nature." Feminist theory's primary concern is with understanding the social, psychological, economic, and political basis for women's realities and experiences. Primary and secondary sources in several disciplines are examined as they contribute to the development of the major branches of first and second wave feminist thinking. Theoretical frameworks will be applied through student participation in collective action projects.

  
  •  

    GWS 3530 - Gender and Global Politics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or PSC 1020

    Description: This course introduces students to the application of feminist theorizing of international relations to critical global issues. The first part of the course examines feminist international relations theory to ascertain how gender reinforms global politics. The second part of the course examines a variety of global issues, such as war, global economic relations, human trafficking, and the environment, to see how the ways we understand, and therefore construct policies to deal with these issues, are gendered.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or PSC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSC 3530
  
  •  

    GWS 3540 - Women in the Developing World



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or PSC 1020 or ANT 1310

    Description: This course presents a cross-cultural study of women's lives in the developing world by examining two main issues: the influence of culture on women's issues and politics' impact on women. By the end of this course students will not only learn about the lives of women in the developing world but also become familiar with how women across the globe articulate the desire for equality.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ANT 3540, HON 3540, PSC 3540
  
  •  

    GWS 3550 - Chicana Feminisms



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or GWS 1001; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will provide students with a general background on Chicana feminist thought. Chicana feminism has carved out a discursive space for Chicanas and other women of color, a space where they can articulate their experiences at the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality, among other considerations. In the process, Chicana feminists have critically challenged Chicano nationalist discourse as well as European and North American feminism. The course will address the diversity in thinking and methodology that defines these discourses thus acknowledging the existence of a variety of feminisms that occur within Chicana intellectual thought. The course will also explore the diversity of realms in which this feminist thinking is applied: labor, education, cultural production (literature, art, performance, etc.), sexuality, and spirituality, among others.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS, GWS, or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 3460, HON 3460
  
  •  

    GWS 3560 - Sociology of Sexuality



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a survey of historical, cultural, and social aspects of human sexuality. The interplay between sex and society will be the major focus. Cross-cultural and historical analysis of sexual values and behavior will be examined. Competing and conflicting sexual value systems in contemporary societies will be analyzed. Other topics include: sexual scripts, sexual deviance and social control, sexual socialization processes, and the social bases of sexual dysfunction.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or SOC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3460
  
  •  

    GWS 3600 - Social Work with Women



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 1010, SWK 1020 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course views social work practice from a feminist social work perspective. It examines issues of equality, social justice, social policy, and practice for women in a patriarchal society. The role of beginning and generalist social workers with women will be examined in the areas of mental health, health, child welfare, welfare, and gerontology.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or SWK.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SWK 3600
  
  •  

    GWS 3650 - Economics of Race and Gender



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ECO 1040 or ECO 2010 or ECO 2020; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course applies the tools of economic analysis to issues that relate to African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and women.  The course analyzes labor markets and how occupational choices and earnings vary systematically by these groups of color and by gender.  The course also examines in detail the intended and unintended consequences of several policies that have addressed this situation.  Finally, economic tools are applied to non-labor market behavior and are used to examine other outcomes that vary by race, ethnicity and gender.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): ECO 3600
  
  •  

    GWS 3651 - U.S. Women's History



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course emphasizes women's changing roles in American history from pre-Columbian times to the present. The course covers the nature of women's work and women's participation in the family, church, and reform movements in the colonial and Republican periods and the 19th and 20th centuries. Students study the emergence of the modern woman in the 20th-century, as well as the re-emergence of the women's movement. The course stresses both the changes and the continuities over the last 300 years.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3650
  
  •  

    GWS 3655 - Women of the American West



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will provide students with an overview of the ways in which women of many cultures shaped the North American West. Women developed the West as a home place, borderland, and frontier. Course themes that will be explored in lectures, discussion, and assignments include gender, masculinity, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, labor, and environment.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3655
  
  •  

    GWS 3660 - Women and Poverty



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 1010, SWK 1020 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course introduces the student to the relationship between gender and poverty and will examine the underlying causes of the "feminization of poverty" in the United States. Social, economic, age-based and ethnic factors will be explored in detail. The differences between prevailing stereotypes and current realities will be highlighted.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3660, SWK 3660
  
  •  

    GWS 3670 - Contemporary Issues in Women's Studies: Variable Topics



    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: Objectives vary with course title, but generally focus on current issues that are constantly changing and developing in this area. Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings.

    Note: This course may be repeated once for credit under different topics.

  
  •  

    GWS 3700 - Psychology of Group Prejudice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or GWS 1001

    Description: This course covers psychological theory and research that examines causes, effects, expressions, and reduction of group prejudice. Various types of group prejudice are addressed, most notably prejudice against cultural and ethnic minorities in the United States (i.e., Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). Sexism and heterosexism also are discussed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 3700, CHS 3700, PSY 3700
 

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