Jan 25, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Gender, Women and Sexualities

  
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    GWS 3910 - Women's Spirituality



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 Recommended

    Description: This course explores the spiritual, psychological, social, political, and cultural aspects of the women's spirituality movement through reading, research, critical reflection, writing, and optional creative /experiential projects. Students engage these concepts and theories in relation to women's experiences within diverse religious traditions, as well as personal spiritual understanding and practices. In addition, students apply a spiritual feminist critique to gender socialization, body image, cultural constructions of power and subordination, social activism, and personal agency.

  
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    GWS 3920 - Women's Health Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or SOC 1010 or HES 1050 or PSY 1001

    Description: This course will give students the opportunity to focus on health issues specific to women and the challenges historically faced by women in the health care arena. This course explores feminist, biological, psychological, and sociological factors in women's health within a global context.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSY 3920, SOC 3920, ITP 3920
  
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    GWS 3930 - Theories of Love and Sex



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course introduces and synthesizes theories from philosophy, psychology, sociology, history, religion, and literature about love and sex.  The complexities of love and sex, including their fundamental meanings, contemporary understandings, identity implications as well as their historical constructions, are explored.  An important dimension of this exploration is the source and meaning of the  moral valuation assigned various forms of sexual activity.

  
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    GWS 3940 - Victim Advocacy for Survivors of Interpersonal Violence



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 and six additional hours in Women's Studies or HSP 1010 and six additional hours in Human Services

    Description: Victim advocacy is both a professional career and area of study, yet it is so often overlooked in traditional academic programs. Individuals who wish to become victim advocates often receive training on the job and not in an academic setting. This class hopes to provide a foundation to the field to complement trainings provided by local victim advocacy agencies and police departments. The primary focus of this class is victim advocacy for survivors of sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking (interpersonal violence). This course provides students with the intellectual and practical skills to understand the issue and provide effective advocacy for survivors of interpersonal violence in a multicultural context. The course explores interpersonal violence in society today, critical cultural considerations, the experience of survivors, and reflections on providing effective advocacy and activism. This is a challenging and rigorous course that asks students to critically think and write about the issues, systemic disparities, engage with difficult material and reflect on their own identities and privileges as it relates to the advocacy relationship.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or HSP.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HSP 3940
  
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    GWS 3960 - Feminist Art Since 1960



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1700 or GWS 1001; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy; or permission of department

    Description: This course examines the various intersections between art and feminism beginning with the rise of second-wave feminist politics and continuing to the present. Work by artists who self-consciously identified as feminist or work that has been meaningfully read through feminist theories is the focus. The course covers competing and diverse definitions of feminism and analyzes the ways race, class and gender are intertwined and represented by artists globally. Students evaluate art's relationship to changing social, political, and philosophical  conditions throughout the period.

     

    Note: Credit will only be granted for one prefix: ARTH or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3385

  
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    GWS 4100 - Women's Holistic Health



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2320 and ITP 3200

    Description: This course takes an in-depth, holistic approach to women's health.  While highlighting new research findings, the class will explore the optimal integration of conventional medicine and complementary modalities for common women's health concerns.  Students will deepen their awareness of tools women can utilize to maintain health and prevent illness.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or ITP.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ITP 4100
  
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    GWS 4160 - Human Trafficking



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001, or AAS 1010, or CJC 1010, or HSP 1010, or PSY 1001, or SWK 1010; upper-division standing; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores human trafficking on international and local levels.  A review of multidisciplinary perspectives on labor and sex trafficking provides comprehensive understanding of this human rights issue.  Students examine the tactics used by traffickers to recruit and control victims and the effects of abuse on victims. This course provides an overview of U.S. federal and local laws to curb trafficking, including federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act.  Finally, students evaluate global and local efforts of the current anti-trafficking movement, including ways to be involved.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 4160, CJC 4160, HON 4160, HSP 4160, PSY 4160, SWK 4160
  
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    GWS 4200 - Gender in Popular Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2770

    Description: This course examines popular culture as a mechanism of mediated communication and explores how the forces of popular culture interact with ideas of gender. This course investigates and analyzes issues relevant to representations of gender in popular culture, including constructions of identity, femininity and masculinity, sexuality, and expectations regarding home, work, and family.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CAS or GWS

    Cross Listed Course(s): CAS 4200
  
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    GWS 4210 - Chicanas and the Politics of Gender



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or GWS 1001, CHS 3460

    Description: This course is designed to further the theoretical understandings of Chicana Feminisms.  The course spends a considerable amount of time dealing with the construction of gender in Chicana/o and Latina/o communities, and how the construction of gender has impacted the daily, lived experiences of not only Chicanas and Latinas, but also of gay, lesbian, transgendered, and queer identified Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.  The course examines the social construction of gender within Chicana/o and Latina/o communities through cultural texts such as academic production, art, film, popular culture, and spirituality.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 4210
  
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    GWS 4230 - The Female Offender



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course examines the nature and causes of female criminality and the responses to female offending by all areas of the criminal justice system e.g. policing, courts and prisons. It blends an in-depth analysis of historical methods of addressing female criminality with an intersectional approach to finding solutions to modern-day problems that can influence criminality among girls and women such as intimate partner violence, poverty, mental illness, and the feminization of work. Topics will include gender norms, girl fights, women who kill, prostitution, human trafficking, women's prisons and women on death row. The course will also address methods for correcting and preventing female criminality from an intersectional approach.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CJC or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CJC 4230
  
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    GWS 4240 - Women and Violence



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or CJC 1010 or PSC 1020 or SOC 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students analyze key patterns and trends in violence perpetrated by and against women, with special focus on the diverse experiences of women in the United States. Students will investigate historical, contemporary, sociopolitical, and cross-cultural patterns in causal factors, perpetuation, prevention, intervention and treatment relative to violence and women. Topics will include sexual violence, domestic violence, family violence, cyber-violence, women in prison, women on death row, and women as victims of violence, among others.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CJC, GWS, PSC, or SOC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CJC 4240, PSC 4240, SOC 4240
  
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    GWS 4250 - Topics in Women's Studies: Variable Topics



    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or Permission of instructor

    Description: Topics are selected to incorporate an in-depth approach to the study of a particular area of historical, cultural, or political significance to women's studies students.

    Note: Check Class Schedule for each semester's offerings. This course may be repeated once for credit as topics change.

  
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    GWS 4750 - Feminist Theory and Practices II: Senior Seminar



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 3510, completion of General Studies requirements, and senior standing; or permission of instructor.

    Description: Designed primarily for women's studies minors and Individualized Degree Program majors as the culmination of work in women's studies.  This seminar will focus on interdisciplinary bibliography and research methodology that students will apply to a senior research paper and presentation.  Papers will reflect each student's particular course of study and focus within the broader context of women's studies and feminist theory.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    GWS 4830 - Workforce Diversity



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing

    Description: This course provides an integrated perspective on the management practices and systems that influence the development and contributions of individuals within a culturally diverse workforce. The focus is on those practices that enhance an organization's effectiveness in the increasingly competitive domestic and global marketplace.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS, HON, or MGT.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural, Senior Experience

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4830, MGT 4830
  
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    GWS 4860 - History of Feminism and Women's Rights



    Credits: 3

    Description: The purpose of this course is to examine the history of American feminism from the Age of the Revolution to the present. Through the use of primary and secondary sources, the philosophies and strategies of women's rights activists and organizations will be examined. Among the special topics to be considered are the conditions and intellectual currents in society that facilitated the growth of American feminism, the achievements of the women's rights movement, the forces that opposed women's rights, and the issues for debate within the feminist movements.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GWS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 4860
  
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    GWS 4920 - Women's Studies Internship



    Credits: 1-12

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001; major or minor in women's studies; upper-division standing; and permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an internship experience in community-based, non-profit, or corporate agencies that serve women and/or underserved populations.  The internship allows the student to integrate and apply gender and social justice theories to their work with community organizations, under joint supervision of the placement supervisor and women's studies professor.

  
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    GWS 4970 - Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Training



    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001

    Description: This course provides students with an intensive experience as an undergraduate teaching assistant in courses offered through Women's Studies either on campus or online. Under close faculty supervision, this course provides training and support for students to learn about feminist pedagogy and processes involved in teaching women's studies courses. Students will be putting into use what they have learned in previous women's studies courses to assist other students enrolled in women's studies classes. The experience includes workshop attendance with additional hours of application in the course. Students need to have already taken the course for which they will be serving as a Teacher Assistant. 

    Note: Students may take the course for a maximum of six credit hours


Geographic Information Systems

  
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    GIS 1220 - Introduction to Geospatial Sciences



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum, acceptable performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics pre-assessment tests. CSS 1010 or CMS 1010, with a grade of "C" is strongly recommended but not required.

    Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a functionally integrated entry into geospatial science. The students will learn basic concepts needed to understand maps, geospatial mapping terminology, and basic field and desktop mapping tools. The focus of this class is on learning the concepts that underlie geospatial mapping and learning the basic software and GPS tools required to start a student in the mapping sciences. Basic analysis and spatial problem-solving skills are addressed in this course. Intermediate and advanced spatial analysis skills are taken up in subsequent GIS courses.

    Note: Students may not receive credit for GEG 1220 and GIS 1220.

  
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    GIS 2250 - Geographic Information Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 1220

    Description: This is a foundation course that provides students with the basic knowledge of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with regard to theoretical, technical, and application issues. It introduces and provides direct experience with the techniques used to analyze and display spatial data using GIS. The skills and knowledge developed in this course will be used to support upper-division courses.

  
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    GIS 2710 - Global Positioning Systems



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 1220 with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course is an introduction to the science of land navigation using maps and a Global Positioning System (GPS), Students navigate positions in the field and apply cartographic principles to GPS lab and field exercises. Emphasis is given to the integration of GPS data with Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

  
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    GIS 3250 - Cartography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 2250 and MTH 1210 with grades of "C" or better; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on basic cartographic and visualization concepts and techniques to convey spatial information. Students will critique and design basic cartographic products such as dot, choropleth, contour, and proportional symbol maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). They will explore advanced visualization techniques such as integrating data, text, and graphics, developing web maps, and animating maps to show temporal change. Cartographic applications for natural resource management and planning are stressed.

  
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    GIS 3920 - Directed Study in Geospatial Sciences



    Credits: 2-6

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 3250

    Description: This course provides an opportunity for upper-division students to independently study a specific topic, initiate their own research or creative project, or assist with a research project initiated by a faculty member in the Geospatial Sciences. Proposals including expected milestones and deliverables will be developed in cooperation with a faculty advisor. The course requires permission of the instructor to enroll.

    Note: This course may be repeated for up to 6 semester hours toward the degree.

  
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    GIS 4810 - GIS Programming



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GIS 4850 or GIS 4860; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is an introduction to programming and scripting for intermediate Geographic Information Systems (GIS) users. The fundamental concepts of scripting and object-oriented programming will be developed using the Python programming language. This course teaches students to design and write clearly structured programs in Python in the ArcGIS environment. Students will develop programs to manage geospatial data, perform geoprocessing analysis to solve spatial problems, and automate mapping and visualization tasks.

  
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    GIS 4840 - Remote Sensing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 1220 and MTH 1110 with grades of "C" or better

    Description: This course provides an overview of photogrammetry and remote sensing principals as well as practical experience in the extraction of earth surface information from hardcopy and digital imagery. Topics include electromagnetic radiation principles, aerial cameras, photo interpretation and measurement, satellite collection systems, digital imagery characteristics, and image processing. The application of remote sensing technologies to land management fields and the integration of digital imagery within Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is emphasized.

  
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    GIS 4850 - Spatial Modeling in Raster



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 2250 and MTH 1110 with grade of "C" or better; upper division standing; or permission of instructor

    Corequisite(s): GIS 3250

    Description: This is an upper-division course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with an emphasis on spatial analysis and modeling. The underlying foundations of map algebra are discussed along with practical exercises that allow the student to develop familiarity with those procedures. This course offers an opportunity for students with a solid background in the fundamentals of GIS to apply the analytical capabilities of this technology to model real-world situations in support of decision-making. Application of GIS to the fields of Land Use Planning and Natural Resource Management are emphasized.

  
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    GIS 4860 - GIS Applications



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 2250 with a grade of "C" or better, upper division standing; or permission of instructor

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GIS 3250

    Description: This course provides advanced theoretical and practical knowledge in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), with emphasis on vector data models. Students will gain conceptual knowledge about the advantages and limitations of various vector GIS data models (shapefiles, coverages, geodatabases) in support of land management and scientific applications, as well as practical exercises using Arc/Info and ArcGIS software. Students will gain advanced experience in spatial data management, spatial analysis, and project management. Students will be responsible for a GIS application project of their own creation.

  
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    GIS 4870 - Spatial Databases



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 4860 with a grade of "C" or better, and upper division standing; or permission of instructor

    Description: This upper-division course emphasizes the challenges and uniqueness of spatial data organization from specific database models to national spatial data infrastructures. Students will gain theoretical and practical experience designing, implementing, and managing georelational and object-relational databases for planning and natural resource applications. Practical experience in spatial database creation using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Database Management Systems (DBMS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be stressed.

  
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    GIS 4880 - Current Topics in GIS: Variable Topics



    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 2250 with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course covers important topics in GIS and remote sensing, emphasizing new concepts and technological developments. The course content will vary, and the course may be repeated for credit as the course topic changes with a maximum of six credits earned.

  
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    GIS 4890 - Advanced GIS Project



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 4860 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This is a senior-level capstone course for land use majors with a concentration in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students serve as GIS specialists working on individual or group projects with emphasis on land use applications. Students manage a project from inception to completion, including databases and maps, as well as a final report and presentation.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    GIS 4910 - Satellite Image Processing and Analysis



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 4840 with grades of "C-" or better and senior standing, or permission of instructor; GIS 4860 or GIS 4850 with grade of "C-" or better.

    Description: This course focuses on current techniques and concepts for processing and analysis of digital satellite remote sensing imagery. The class covers both theoretical and practical applications of image processing techniques for land cover classification and land condition analysis. Topics include image preprocessing, enhancements, indices, and classification. Students conduct an original research project in addition to reviews of current literature.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    GIS 4920 - Advanced Directed Study in Geospatial Sciences



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GIS 4860 with a grade of "C-" or better, senior standing, and permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an opportunity for students with senior standing to create, initiate, manage, and analyze data for a unique undergraduate research project in Geospatial Sciences, with guidance from a faculty advisor. A review of scientific literature relevant to the research topic is required, along with a research proposal outlining objectives, methods, and deliverables. A written scientific report is also required at the conclusion of the project. Students must obtain permission from the instructor in order to enroll in this Senior Experience course.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Geography

  
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    GEG 1000 - World Regional Geography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests

    Description: This course presents the study of the formation, behavior, and interaction of social, political, cultural, and economic regions throughout the world.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I, Global Diversity

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

  
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    GEG 1100 - Introduction to Physical Geography



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course explores the various elements of the physical environment and interactions between the elements. The course emphasizes the atmosphere (weather and climate), the lithosphere (soils, geology, and landforms), and the hydrosphere (oceans, streams, and groundwater).

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC2

  
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    GEG 1120 - Orienteering



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course familiarizes students with the reading and interpretation of topographic maps and the use of the compass. Orienteering exercises are conducted in the field.

  
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    GEG 1300 - Introduction to Human Geography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests

    Description: This course provides an introduction to geographic perspectives, concepts, and methods as they apply to the study of human activities. Emphasis is placed on explaining human spatial patterns and their consequences. Topics covered include population, migration, language, religion, folk and economic development, political systems, and resources.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I, Global Diversity

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

  
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    GEG 1610 - Introduction to Planning



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course provides an overview of the role of planning in land use, different types of planning processes, public and private sector actors, skills required of planners, and planning documents and maps.

  
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    GEG 1910 - Global Water Concerns



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing placement tests

    Description: In this course, water is examined as a natural and societal resource using local, national, and intemational examples. Landforms and processes related to water such as the hydrologic cycle, watersheds, surface water, and groundwater are surveyed. Students leam about water use in early civilizations, water and culture, water quality and treatment, and water law. The critical issue of water conservation and scarcity is reviewed in the context of the social, legal, political, economic, and physical infrastructure that controls water around the world.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences, Global Diversity

  
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    GEG 1920 - Concepts and Connections in Geography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment tests

    Description: This course introduces the basic concepts and themes of geography, covering both physical and cultural aspects of the Earth's surface. Students will develop the analytical skills to understand how people shape and are shaped by their environment. The course examines how the human experience and human activity create and sustain places; how climates, land forms, and water processes shape the earth's surface; the interconnections between physical and cultural phenomena; and how this knowledge relates to everyday life.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC2

  
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    GEG 2020 - Geography of Colorado



    Credits: 3

    Description: Geography of Colorado presents the study of the physical, economic, and cultural features of Colorado. These features include climate, landforms, history, water resources, energy and minerals, mining, soil, natural vegetation, agriculture, population characteristics, the economy, current issues, as well as their interactions, and the overall geographic setting.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS2

  
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    GEG 2200 - Geography of the United States



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Six hours of earth science courses

    Description: This course is a survey of the geography of the U.S., including an overview of the physical characteristics, landforms, climate, soil, vegetation, and natural resources. Regions of the U.S. are studied, including the distribution of population, agriculture, industry, transportation, and culture. Geographic problems and issues are raised.

  
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    GEG 2300 - Geographic Analysis of Social Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

    Description: This course is a geographic analysis of current social issues. Topics include urban spatial problems such as crowding and crime, drugs and gangs, population growth, environmental perception, resource use, and culturally based land-use patterns. The administration of space, boundaries, territoriality, and spatial learning are discussed.

  
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    GEG 3000 - Historical Geography of the U.S.



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Six hours of geography or permission of instructor; GEG 1300, GEG 2200, or HIS 1210 recommended

    Description: This course examines the unique interrelationships between geography and history. Topics covered include frontiers and boundaries, settlement patterns, environmental perception, sequent occupancy, changing land-use practices, migration, and urban growth. Further, the course addresses the interrelationships between different physical environments and cultural landscapes.

  
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    GEG 3300 - Land Use, Culture, and Conflict



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 1400 or NAS 1000 or PSC 1010 and at least junior standing

    Description: This course is designed to introduce students to theories, approaches, and controversies concerning use of land and resources on Indian Reservations. Reading and discussion will be directed toward questions related to differing views on land use and resources, how modernization impacts traditional settings, as well as treaties and governmental policies that govern Indian land. Case studies which illustrate current conflict/resolution issues between Native Americans and other actors such as federal, state and local governments will be examined.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): NAS 3300, PSC 3300
  
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    GEG 3360 - Economic Geography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

    Description: This course investigates the "economic landscape" and analyzes global patterns of spatial interdependence in a systems framework. Spatial economic models are examined through case studies and class exercises. The relationships between human activity and land-use patterns are examined in a world/regional context.

  
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    GEG 3520 - Regional Geography: Variable Topics



    Credits: 2-3

    Prerequisite(s): Six hours of earth science courses Specific regions of the world will be selected for in-depth study

    Description: Topics will include physical and cultural geography, demographics, economic activity, urbanization, political geography, and environmental issues.

    Note: The course may be repeated for credit as a different region is studied.

  
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    GEG 3600 - Urban Geography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 1300

    Description: This course examines theories of urban development and factors that affect urbanization, such as demographic change, annexation, zoning, and infrastructure development. Models of urban land use are examined in the context of cities in the United States. Students learn how to prepare and analyze census-tract maps.

  
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    GEG 3610 - Principles of Land Use Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600

    Description: In this course students learn basic land-use planning concepts and how to analyze land-use patterns, interpret land-use maps, and analyze existing land-use plans. Further, students learn how to collect relevant data, prepare a comprehensive land-use plan, and predict future planning issues. Special attention is paid to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in land-use planning.

  
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    GEG 3630 - Transportation Planning and Land Use



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610, six additional hours of geography

    Description: This course is an analysis of transportation systems as they relate to other types of land use. Transportation networks are examined in terms of types, patterns, and densities. Consideration is given to alternative transportation systems as they relate to energy savings, pollution prevention, and the reduction of congestion.

  
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    GEG 3700 - Urban Sustainability



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600 and GEG 3610

    Description: This course examines the relationship between urbanization and sustainability. It analyzes the opportunities and challenges of cities to initiate, foster and manage the pace of change needed to transition to sustainability. It evaluates how cities throughout the world are planning for sustainability and reducing their carbon footprint and, in doing so, learning how to foster change in local contexts. The course also provides students with the professional tools to identify and learn how sustainable urban planning practices generated in dynamic U.S. and international contexts can be adapted to different urban local settings to find creative ways to transition to urban sustainability.

  
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    GEG 3720 - Global Sustainable Development



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3360

    Description: This course surveys the sustainability concept and sustainable development practices focusing on: economic growth and environmental degradation, the overuse of resources and the generation of waste, and the effectiveness of environment protection and environmental justice. It examines the environmental implications of production systems, consumption patterns, and waste generation in the global north as well as poverty and exclusion in the global south. It reviews the evolution of sustainability and sustainable development as major policy-making paradigms for addressing the tension between economic development and environmental protection. The course also examines the technocentric approach to environmental degradation and other
    alternative approaches that emphasize justice, socio/economic equity and ecological responsibility.

  
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    GEG 3920 - Directed Study in Geography



    Credits: 2-6

    Prerequisite(s): Departmental or instructor permission

    Description: This course provides an opportunity for upper-division students to conduct a specific project in the field of Geography. Students may develop a unique undergraduate research project or assist with a research project initiated by a faculty member. The faculty advisor guides each. The course requires permission of the instructor to enroll. Students may not receive more than 9 hours of credit for this course and the previous courses titled "Directed Study in Land Use."

  
  •  

    GEG 4020 - Field Experience in Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): EDS 3140

    Corequisite(s): HIS 4010

    Description: This field-based course provides opportunities to develop teacher candidates' professional and pedagogical skills in a Social Studies classroom.  In coordination with the classroom teacher, teacher candidates will design and implement content lessons, use content strategies to improve both information acquisition and literacy skills, and adjust instruction for students with diverse needs.  Course assignments and evaluations are designed to help teacher candidates become reflective practitioners.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GEG or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 4020
  
  •  

    GEG 4610 - Urban and Regional Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610

    Description: This course studies the philosophy and scope of urban and regional planning and the principles and factors of planning and their interrelationships.

  
  •  

    GEG 4620 - Residential Land Use Patterns



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3600 or GEG 3610 or six hours of urban studies courses

    Description: This course examines spatial patterns of urban growth, factors that affect housing, the role of nonprofit developers in the current housing market, as well as theories that explain the residential mosaic of North American cities. It includes an analysis of current housing trends as well as the housing types, densities, patterns and geographic distribution, as well as the interrelationships with other aspects of the urban environment, including infrastructure.

  
  •  

    GEG 4640 - Recreational Land Use Patterns



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3610 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course considers various types of recreation space, including greenbelts; open space; wilderness areas; and national, state and local parks. It relates recreational land to the land-use planning process, as well as the environmental impacts of recreation.

  
  •  

    GEG 4700 - Sustainability in Resource Management



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 3720

    Description: This course traces the evolution of current thought and practice in the environmental debate of resources. It reviews the politics of resource management as it relates to a broader set of issues about economic development, sustainability, and social equity. It examines the environmental and social effects associated with development of specific land-based resources. Topics covered include consumerism, the growth economy, global climate change, hydropolitics, food systems and agriculture, deforestation, warfare, and ecological and human impacts of environmental degradation. The course provides a framework to examine the politics of resource management and environmental policy and how contending approaches and practices impact human development and environments.

  
  •  

    GEG 4710 - Legal Aspects of Land Use



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 4010 or GEG 3610 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course studies the laws, ordinances, and regulations related to land use, as well as the role of federal, state, and local government in regulating and controlling land use. The course makes use of case studies and local issues.

  
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    GEG 4720 - Sustainability in Mitigation Planning



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 1100 and GEG 3610, ENV 4010 recommended

    Description: This course studies the principles of community emergency planning and hazard mitigation to reduce the longterm risks and impact of natural hazards on local communities. It acknowledges that natural hazards such as floods, storms, and earthquakes cannot be prevented; their risks to life and property can be greatly reduced through advance mitigation planning that reduces or eliminates long-term risks of natural hazard vulnerability. It recognizes that natural-environmental hazards are inextricably intertwined with sustainable development. The course reviews how sustainable community development that improves social equity while minimizing environmental damage reduces the vulnerability of a community to natural disasters. The course provides the
    required skills to design a strategic program to elaborate a hazard mitigation plan for local communities.

  
  •  

    GEG 4950 - Internship in Geography



    Credits: 2-15

    Prerequisite(s): Departmental or instructor permission

    Description: This course provides an on-the-job internship experience with a geography-related company or agency. The experience must be done under qualified supervision and under the direction of an Earth and Atmospheric Sciences faculty member. Students may not receive more than 15 hours of credit for this course and the previous course titled "Internship in Land Use."

  
  •  

    GEG 4970 - Sustainability Practice Seminar



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 4700 and 12 hours of upper-division courses in natural and/or social science or written permission of instructor; completion of all SBS I and II and Natural and Physical Sciences General Studies course requirements, senior standing.

    Description: This course is a senior-level, capstone seminar for EAS students addressing the issue of how to integrate the environmental, social, and economic dimensions of sustainability into decision-making, project development, and assessment. The primary purpose of the course is to develop the knowledge and skills required to evaluate sustainable proposals and existing sustainable practices and to develop new alternatives for problem-solving. Topics covered include sustainable planning for climate change and adaptation to water scarcity. The pedagogic strategy of this course is to provide students with a grounded, hands-on experience in the practice of sustainability assessment.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Geology

  
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    GEL 1010 - Physical Geology



    Credits: 4

    Description: This course introduces the basic theories, concepts, and assumptions used in geology, utilizing both lecture and laboratory components. It includes earth's internal systems from core to crust, as well as the dynamics of the lithosphere with its processes, products, and effects on the environment. Students will learn to identify common rocks and minerals.

    Field Trips: A field trip is required.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
  •  

    GEL 1020 - Geology of Colorado



    Credits: 3

    Description: This science course focuses on the State of Colorado to introduce basic concepts, principles, theories, and assumptions in geology. The course covers Colorado's major geological provinces and landforms; common minerals, rocks, and fossils; geologic processes; geologic resources and hazards; and important events in Colorado's geologic history.

    Field Trips: One field trip is required.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
  •  

    GEL 1030 - Historical Geology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 or Permission of the Instructor

    Description:

    This course presents the origin and history of the Earth as well as the evolution of its life, based on the rock and fossil record. The course also reviews the changing geography of the Earth through geologic time, emphasizing the theory of plate tectonics. A field trip is required.

    Field Trips: A field trip is required.

  
  •  

    GEL 1150 - Physical Oceanography



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics pre-assessment placement tests

    Description: This introductory course studies the world's oceans, including geographic, geologic and physical features of the ocean basins and the physical and chemical properties of ocean water. Other major topics include ocean exploration, ocean waves, currents and tides, air-sea interactions, marine ecology, and geologic history. The course emphasizes the use and control of ocean resources and the impact of ocean pollution.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
  •  

    GEL 1510 - Geology of Red Rocks Park and Vicinity



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 recommended

    Description: This course examines the geology of Red Rocks Park and vicinity, including rocks formed over a period of approximately 1.7 billion years. Along with basic concepts of geology, the formations exposed along the Front Range, including their ages, rock types, origins, and economic products, are examined within a concept of geologic history.  The geologic history includes Colorado's famous "disappearing" mountain range (the Ancestral Rocky Mountains), evidence of ancient oceans and deserts, dinosaur bones and tracks and the uplift of the modern-day Rocky Mountains.

    Note: Students may not receive credit for both GEL 1510 and GEL 1520. Students cannot enroll in both GEL 1510 and GEL 3510 for credit at the same time.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
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    GEL 1520 - Garden of the Gods-Front Range Geology



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 recommended

    Description: This course examines the geology along the Front Range from Boulder to Colorado Springs through rock exposures covering a span of approximately 1.7 billion years. Basic concepts of geology are applied to the formations exposed along the Front Range. These formations are examined with respect to age, rock type, origin, and economic products. The geologic history includes Colorado's famous "disappearing" mountain range (the Ancestral Rocky Mountains), evidence of ancient oceans and deserts, dinosaur bones and tracks, and the uplift of the modern-day Rocky Mountains.

    Note: Students may not receive credit for both GEL 1510 and GEL 1520. Students cannot enroll in both GEL 1520 and GEL 3520 for credit at the same time.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
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    GEL 1530 - Geology of the Colorado Plateau



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): None; GEL 1010, GEL 1510, GEL 1520 and/or GEL 1560 are recommended

    Description: This course examines the geology of the eastern Colorado Plateau, including the geology of the Colorado National Monument, Arches National Park, and Southern Canyon lands National Parks. Along with basic concepts of geology, the formations exposed in the eastern Colorado Plateau, including their ages, rock types and origins, are examined. Historical geology and geomorphology come to life in this beautiful, desolate, arid country. Students must be in good physical condition because strenuous hiking is involved, and students must have prior camping experience.

    Note: Note: Students cannot take both GEL 1530 and GEL 3530 for credit.

  
  •  

    GEL 1550 - Geology of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 recommended

    Description: This course emphasizes the processes and landforms associated with the eolian (wind) and desert environments at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument, located in the San Luis Valley between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Investigations of the dune fields allow students to identify various types of dunes, as well as damage related to desertification. The relationships of sand source areas, cross-bedding, and transport directions are investigated.

    Note: Students cannot take both GEL 1550 and GEL 3550 for credit.

  
  •  

    GEL 2530 - Introduction to Geologic Field Methods



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): GEL1010, GEG1220 or equivalent

    Description: This course is an introduction to field measurements and data collection for earth scientists. It examines methods and procedures in sampling, measuring, describing, mapping, and ascertaining field data. The heart of the course is a week-long field experience studying a variety of geologic features where students will be trained in hands-on practices pertinent to industry and academia, such as strike and dip measurements, triangulation procedures, field notebook entries, orienteering~. Students must be in good physical condition because strenuous hiking is involved. Additional field trip fees are required.

  
  •  

    GEL 3050 - Introduction to Mineralogy and Optical Mineralogy



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010, CHE 1800

    Description: This course examines common minerals, their origin, associations within rocks, their basic geochemistry and identification. It includes a discourse in crystallography, as well as methodologies of identification utilizing practical laboratory and field techniques such as hand specimens analysis, chemical methods, X-ray crystallography, and the use of optical microscopy.

    Field Trips: A field trip is required.

  
  •  

    GEL 3060 - Stratigraphy and Structure



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 and GEL 3050; MTH 1120 or MTH 1400

    Description: This course analyzes vertical and horizontal stratigraphic and structural relationships within the Earth's crust. The stratigraphic portion of the course emphasizes transgressive and regressive sequences and unconformity boundaries (sequence stratigraphy) while the structural portion emphasizes three-dimensional relationships found in folded and faulted rocks.

    Field Trips: Field trips are required

  
  •  

    GEL 3120 - Geomorphology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010 or GEG 1100

    Description: This course is a detailed analysis of the Earth's landforms, including their origins and sequential changes due to internal and surficial processes. Maps and aerial photographs are extensively used for geomorphic interpretations.

    Field Trips: Field trips are required

  
  •  

    GEL 3420 - Soil Resources



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 1200 and completion of General Studies

    Description: This course analyzes the materials and processes that combine to produce various soil types. Soil types are examined in relationship to climate, landforms, vegetation, and geology, as well as in relation to land-use patterns.

    Field Trips: Required field trips investigate soil-mapping techniques

  
  •  

    GEL 3440 - Energy and Mineral Resources



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 1400 and GEL 3050, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course investigates mineral resources and reserves that serve our industrial society. It includes a detailed examination of the origin, physical characteristics, and distribution of mineral resources, including metals and nonmetals, and energy resources, including fossil fuels and alternative energy resources.

    Field Trips: Field trips are required

  
  •  

    GEL 3510 - Advanced Geology of Red Rocks Park and Vicinity



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): Nine hours of geography or geology or permission of instructor

    Description: This course requires an analytical approach to the geology of Red Rocks Park and vicinity, including rocks formed over a period of approximately two billion years. The geologic history includes Colorado's famous "disappearing" mountain range (the Ancestral Rocky Mountains), evidence of ancient oceans and deserts, dinosaur bones and tracks, and the uplift of the modern-day Rocky Mountains.

    Note: Students cannot take both GEL 1510 and GEL 3510 for credit.

  
  •  

    GEL 3520 - Advanced Garden of the Gods-Front Range Geology



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): Nine hours of geography or geology or permission of instructor

    Description: This course requires an analytical approach to the geology along the Front Range from Boulder to Colorado Springs through rock exposures covering a span of approximately two billion years. Along with basic concepts of geology, the formations exposed along the Front Range, including their age, rock types, origins and economic products, are analyzed within a context of geologic history.

    Note: Students cannot take both GEL 1520 and GEL 3520 for credit.

  
  •  

    GEL 3530 - Advanced Geology of the Colorado Plateau Field Course: Variable Topics



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010, at least one prior lower-division field course (e.g., GEL 1510, GEL 1520, GEL 1530, GEL 2530) or permission of instructor

    Description: This advanced field course requires an analytical approach to the geology of the Colorado Plateau and surrounding areas. Variable topics include a variety of geological destinations, such as, but not limited to, the Colorado National Monument, Dead Horse Point State Park, Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, Capitol Reef National Park, Goblin Valley State Park and Utah's Basin and Range province, Grand Canyon and Petrified Forest National Parks, Zion and Bryce Canyon National Parks. Along with basic concepts of geology, the formations exposed in the Colorado Plateau, including their ages, rock types, and origins are analyzed. Historical geology, geomorphology, stratigraphy, geological structures and field geology come to life in this beautiful,
    desolate, arid country. Students must be in good physical condition because strenuous hiking is involved. Prior field and camping experience is also recommended.

    Note: Students cannot enroll concurrently in GEL 3530 and GEL 1530 during the same semester.

    Field Trips: Additional field trip fees for transportation, food, lodging, etc. are required.

  
  •  

    GEL 3550 - Advanced Geology of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): Nine hours of geography or geology or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course analyzes the processes and landforms associated with the eolian (wind) and desert environments at the Great Sand Dunes National Monument, located in the San Luis Valley between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Analysis of the dune fields allows students to identify various type of dunes, as well as damage related to desertification. The relationships of sand source areas, cross-bedding and transport directions are analyzed.

    Note: Students cannot take both GEL 1550 and GEL 3550 for credit.

  
  •  

    GEL 3920 - Directed Study in Geology



    Credits: 2-6

    Prerequisite(s): Fifteen hours in geology; Permission of instructor and department chair

    Description: This course provides an opportunity for upper-division students with a strong background in geology to pursue study in a specific topic of interest and value. The course requires permission of the instructor and chair of the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences department and frequent meetings between student and instructor.

  
  •  

    GEL 4050 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 3050

    Description: This course involves the study of the nature, composition, origin, and history of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students will be introduced to the principles that govern the mineralogical and textural diagenesis of these systems and their unique mineral assemblages. Lab exercises in optical microscopy, geochemical data interpretation, graphical analysis and classification modalities are essential components. Prior working knowledge of polarized optical microscopy, mineralogy, and chemistry is prerequisite. Familiarity with programming simple electronic spreadsheet algorithms is highly recommended. A fieldtrip is required.

  
  •  

    GEL 4150 - Hydrology (Surface Water)



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEG 1100 or GEG 1910 or ENV 3400

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CSS 1010 or CIS 1010, MTH 1210

    Description: In this course, students examine surface waters with respect to water flow, drainage systems, storage, pollution and environmental relationships. The hydrologic cycle is studied with respect to the amount and distribution of water, the movement and fluxes of water and current water-related issues. Topics addressed include hydrologic data sources, statistical analysis in hydrologic problem-solving, hydrograph analysis, hydrographic routing, hydrologic modeling and current challenges ofurban hydrology, hydrologic models and hydrologic design.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: GEL or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4150
  
  •  

    GEL 4250 - Hydrogeology (Groundwater)



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1010, CHE 1800, MTH 1110

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GEL 3420

    Description: This course is a practical approach to the study of groundwater with emphasis on water quality, underground flow, pumping, and infiltration/recharge principles in relationship to the geologic environment. The course includes practical methods of laboratory water quality testing, groundwater flow analysis and experimentation, as well as septic system design and evaluation. Since mathematical models are involved, familiarity with graphing and algebraic operations is of essence. A foundational knowledge in geology is prerequisite.

    Field Trips: Self-guided group fieldtrips are required for this course.

  
  •  

    GEL 4400 - Applied Field Volcanology



    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 3050

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): GEL 4050

    Description: This hybrid field and lecture course explores volcanic activity both past and present. Eruptive mechanisms, lithology, geomorphology, environmental and economic impacts as well as geologic hazards are discussed. Hands-on field work applying theoretical knowledge to the active study of volcanic geology, associated petrology, and eruptive geohazard assessment by visiting several active volcanoes is an integral part of the course. Additional trip fees apply.

  
  •  

    GEL 4450 - Sedimentary Geology and Stratigraphy



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 1030, GEL 3050, and MTH 1120 or MTH 1400

    Description: This course focuses on geologic concepts, principles, theories, and techniques for investigating how sedimentary rocks and strata develop and change through space and time. Within this framework, the course covers the origin and transport of sediment; physical properties and classification of sedimentary rocks; sedimentary diagenesis; depositional environments; depositional basins; stratigraphic classification systems; and field techniques for sedimentary geology and stratigraphy. Field trips are required.

  
  •  

    GEL 4460 - Structural Geology and Mapping



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): GEL 4450

    Description: This course focuses on concepts, principles, theories, and techniques to investigate the development and spatial orientation of geologic structures such as folds and faults, as well as the mapping of geologic structures. Field trips are required.

  
  •  

    GEL 4950 - Internship in Geology



    Credits: 2-15

    Prerequisite(s): Land Use major with upper division standing plus 12 upper division hours of earth science courses and Permission of the chair of the earth and atmospheric sciences department

    Description: This course provides an on-the-job internship experience with a land-use-related company or agency. The experience must be done under qualified supervision and under the direction of an Earth and Atmospheric Sciences faculty member.

  
  •  

    GEL 4970 - Undergraduate Research in Geology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1210, GEL 3050, senior standing

    Description: This course is a senior-level capstone course for geoscience majors that focuses on independent research to investigate a selected geological problem involving field and/or laboratory observations. Preparation of a paper or poster suitable for professional presentation is required.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


German

  
  •  

    GER 1010 - Elementary German I



    Credits: 5

    Description: This course focuses on skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and cultural competency.

  
  •  

    GER 1020 - Elementary German II



    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite(s): GER 1010 or one year of high school German or its equivalent with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course is a continuation of GER 1010 and focuses on skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and cultural competency.

    Note: This course requires a grade of "C" or better to fulfill the General Studies requirement.

    General Studies: Oral Communication

  
  •  

    GER 1800 - International German Year I



    Credits: 1-15

    Description: This is a variable-credit course for first-year students learning German in a study-abroad setting. It recognizes an approved study-abroad educational experience in German speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing.

  
  •  

    GER 2010 - Intermediate German I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GER 1020 or equivalent

    Description: This course is the first of a two-semester, integrated, second-year sequence. The course focuses on further skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and on cultural competency. Class is conducted mostly in German and will include a variety of interactive activities designed to help students develop their knowledge of German and their ability to use it productively in situations of communication.

  
  •  

    GER 2020 - Intermediate German II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GER 2010 or equivalent

    Description: This course is a continuation of GER 2010 and is the second of a two-semester, integrated, second-year sequence. The course focuses on further skills development in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with emphasis on the use of functional, communicative language for oral and written proficiency and on cultural competency. Class is conducted mostly in German and will include a variety of interactive activities designed to help students develop their knowledge of German and their ability to use it productively in situations of communication.

  
  •  

    GER 2110 - German Reading and Conversation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): One year of college German or equivalent or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course prepares the student to read and to communicate with ease in German. It emphasizes vocabulary and idiomatic phrases used in everyday language.

  
  •  

    GER 2120 - German Civilization



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): One year of college German or equivalent or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course emphasizes the broadening of reading and conversational skills. It introduces the student to various aspects of German civilization, from its geography and history to its philosophical and political thought, arts, music, and modern living.

  
  •  

    GER 2800 - International German Year II



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): One year of college German or equivalent

    Description: This variable-credit course recognizes second-year study of German language and culture in an approved study-abroad setting.

  
  •  

    GER 3010 - Third-Year German Conversation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GER 2110 or 2120 or four years of high school German

    Description: This course strengthens conversational ability with more complicated idiomatic and structural elements, using techniques such as skits, debates, and small-group discussions to improve fluency and broaden the scope of communication. Conducted in German.

  
  •  

    GER 3050 - Cultural Crossroads: France, Germany, Spain



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: This course gives students the cultural background necessary to understand and appreciate those spiritual and intellectual developments that have given today's three European nations (representing our language disciplines) their characteristics. Main topics include the Indo- European language family, the cultural and technological development of Germanic and Romance-speaking countries, the causes for the rise and fall of these countries throughout the 2000 years under consideration, the role of women in politics and the arts, the development of differing social etiquette, reasons for mass emigrations, and contributions of immigrants to their new countries, and the effect that the European Union has on the educational social welfare of its member nations.

    Note: Students can get credit for only one prefix.

    Cross Listed Course(s): FRE 3050, HON 3050, MDL 3050, SPA 3050
  
  •  

    GER 3150 - German Phonetics: Theory and Practice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of college German or equivalent or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers improvement of pronunciation and speech habits based on an understanding of the phonetics of German. After an introduction to the basic speech mechanism through principles of linguistics, the course offers practice in pronunciation through the declamation of selected texts.

  
  •  

    GER 3200 - German Culture and Civilization



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of college German or equivalent, or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course is an advanced German conversational approach to the main cultural events that have shaped German lifestyles. Historical events, as well as modern German lifestyles of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland are discussed. The format is reading-discussion, conducted in German. Students are required to give oral presentations.

  
  •  

    GER 3210 - Survey of German Literature I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Two years of college German or equivalent or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an insight into German historical and cultural development through selected readings in German literature, from its beginning to the 18th century.

 

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