Jan 25, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Biology

  
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    BIO 4510 - Microbial Ecology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2400 and six hours of upper-division microbiology and/or molecular biology courses; or permission of instructor; completion of General Studies requirements; and senior standing.

    Description: This course is a detailed study of microbial ecology, emphasizing population interactions, quantitative ecology, habitat ecology, and biochemical cycling. Discussion of biotechnological aspects of microbial ecology is included.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    BIO 4540 - Plant Ecology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2100, or permission of instructor, senior standing, and completion of General Studies requirements.

    Description: This course proceeds from a study of concepts (matter and energy, food webs, nutrient cycles, succession) to a discussion of populations, communities, and biomes, emphasizing the interrelationships and interdependence of living things with each other and with their nonliving environment.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    BIO 4550 - Animal Ecology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3200 or BIO 3260, and six hours of upper division biology courses, or permission of instructor; senior standing; and completion of General Studies requirements.

    Description: In this course, a detailed consideration is made of population dynamics, intra- and interspecific interactions, niche segregation, species diversity, specialization and distributional patterns. Appropriate readings from current literature will be required.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    BIO 4560 - Field Methods in Plant Ecology



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 4540

    Description: Weekly field trips are made to various plant communities. The student will learn sampling methods, data analysis, vegetative mapping, report writing and data presentation.

  
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    BIO 4820 - Developmental Biology



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3600 or BIO 3610 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on molecular mechanisms and gene regulation underlying development of select invertebrates and vertebrates, from fertilization through early organ formation. Similar processes in human development and disease are highlighted. The laboratory includes study of living Drosophila embryos and larvae. Laboratory drawings are required.

  
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    BIO 4850 - Evolution



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3600 or BIO 3610, or permission of instructor, satisfaction of all General Studies course requirements, senior standing

    Description: This course will develop an awareness and understanding of organismic evolution as the foundation of biological thought. The major features of evolution-variation, natural selection, adaptation and specialization-and their significance to the origin and evolution of major plant and animal groups are investigated. A research paper and an oral presentation will be required.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    BIO 4950 - Undergraduate Research in Biology



    Credits: 1-2

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 3600 or 3610 and permission of instructor

    Description: Students will engage in a research project that involves the application of scientific methodology to biological problems. Experience will be gained in literature searches, generating hypotheses, data collection, data handling, data analyses, and presentation of results. Course may be repeated. A maximum of 4 credits of independent study/intemships/practicum/undergraduate research may be applied toward a major or minor in Biology.


Business

  
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    BUS 1850 - Introduction to Business



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course presents an introduction to business concepts that are further developed in the business core and in other courses pursued by business and economics majors. Also discussed are contemporary issues facing business. This course allows business students to develop a context for their studies and gives non-business students insights into the world of business.

    Note: (Course revised July 13, 2017)

  
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    BUS 3040 - Global Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): At least 60 semester hours earned

    Description: This course offers a global perspective of responsibility for conducting sustainable business.  The over-arching theme is the integration of planet, people, and profits. Values and cultural differences among corporate entities, countries, and societies are explored within the context of stakeholder analyses.  Leadership characteristics within successful companies are examined.  Examples and case analyses provide means to explore social, cultural, and human aspects of doing business worldwide.

    Note: (Course added July 13, 2017)

  
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    BUS 4500 - Career Planning



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing

    Description: This course provides the opportunity for students to analyze and evaluate the information needed, processes involved, and the skills required for career planning. Processes of industry research, self-assessment, occupational exploration, and preparation for employment are critiqued, designed, and implemented. In addition to traditional classroom activities, content is presented in an experiential manner through observation, role-play, simulations, individual projects, and contact with resource experts.


Career and Personal Development

  
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    CPD 1300 - Transformations: Student Success



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course focuses on the tangible student skills and strategies that lead to self-efficacy and self-advocacy, the development of student-focused habits of mind and a growth mindset, and the achievement of college completion goals. The course helps students learn to navigate societal systems including higher education. Course topics and a required on-campus service learning placement will help students to identify the means and ways of integration into the campus community that promote a sense of belonging and facilitate exploration of major courses of study and career paths. This course has Service Learning Designation such that some sections may include a Service Learning component.

  
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    CPD 2300 - Time Management



    Credits: 1

    Description: Learning to manage time efficiently is a necessary skill for successful students, educators, and professionals. This course is designed to enable women and men to analyze their use of time, identify factors that contribute to wasting time, and improve use of time through better prioritizing, scheduling, and increased motivation.

  
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    CPD 2310 - Stress Management



    Credits: 1

    Description: In every individual's life there are numerous sources of stress. Instead of simply treating the symptoms of stress, this course will help students identify their own causes of stress and then deal with those causes prescriptively. Discussions will focus on understanding stress theory, personality attributes that contribute to stress, stress in the work environment, and relationship stress.

  
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    CPD 2320 - Self Esteem



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course will explore the issues of self-esteem within a feminist framework, including the effects of sexism on self-worth, the role of women in a sexist society, and the tools needed to survive with a strong self-image. The goal is to apply what is learned to enhancing everyday living through an understanding of societal, familial, and self-induced pressures.

  
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    CPD 2330 - Assertiveness



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course explores assertive behavior from a feminist point of view. The differences between passive, assertive, and aggressive behaviors are discussed. Avenues for change and tools to achieve change are identified.

  
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    CPD 2340 - Sexual Harassment/Discrimination



    Credits: 1

    Description: This interactive workshop will help students to become aware of sexual harassment and learn how to stop and prevent it.

  
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    CPD 2350 - Career Evaluation Workshop



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course will focus on career evaluation and will assist students in acquiring the skills and attitudes to plan effectively for and manage the changes which they will experience during their work lives.

  
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    CPD 2360 - Multilevel Wellness



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course will empower students with tools to attain their own personal sense of well-being. It will address wellness as a multilevel process consisting of emotional, cognitive, somatic, and spiritual components. The workshop will include information, experiential exercises, and process work. Group work and journal keeping will also be used to bridge the communication gap between the self and others.

  
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    CPD 2370 - Money Issues for Women



    Credits: 1

    Description: The economic and social circumstances of women's lives in the United States often place them in a different material and psychological relationship to money and issues surrounding money than men. This course will review a variety of issues women face when planning for the future, as well as some of the tools used to build a secure future.

    Note: Credit will be granted under one prefix only: CPD or FIN.

    Cross Listed Course(s): FIN 2370
  
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    CPD 2380 - Finding an Internship



    Credits: 1

    Description: This is an internship preparation course for students from any department without a pre-internship class in their curriculum. Students will develop a plan for finding an internship site and learn the skills needed to successfully obtain the internship. They will research potential employers, write a resume and cover letter, and develop interviewing skills. Students will also reflect on the process of finding an internship in their field and develop goals and learning objectives for their placement.

    Note: Course Number Revised February 8, 2017

  
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    CPD 3300 - Women's Leadership



    Credits: 2

    Description: This course will examine the various roles, models, and guiding principles of women in leadership. The discussions will be intentionally interactive as students share their own experience of women's leadership ranging from traditional to unconventional. Students will identify the values most clearly associated with women's leadership crossculturally and read diverse women's experiences in their communities. Each student will interview a woman whom they deem to be in a leadership role, though not necessarily a formal position, and will present his or her findings to the class. All class members will reflect on their own leadership values in relation to the course material.

    Note: Credit will be granted under one prefix only: CPD or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): GWS 3300
  
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    CPD 3320 - Women's Self-Defense



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course will begin by examining the psychological tools needed to defend oneself and will gradually move into the actual, physical skills necessary to survive, escape, avoid and/or resist violence. The Women's Empowerment Model will be presented. This model emphasizes self-respect, an understanding of one's inalienable human rights, and the determination and ability to protect those rights. Students will learn self-defense against verbal and physical assaults by becoming more aware, assertive and skilled in physical resistance techniques. Using interactive exercises, students will practice both verbal and physical self-defense skills. All ability levels are welcome, but the class is extremely physical; thus, students should come prepared to move.

    Note: Credit will be granted under one prefix only: CPD or HPL.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HPL 3320
  
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    CPD 4100 - Promoting Your Individualized Degree



    Credits: 1

    Description: This course provides the opportunity for Individualized Degree Program (IDP) students to synthesize the interdisciplinary learning they have done for their major/minor.  Participants will analyze the transformative outcomes of their IDP experiences to prepare for post-graduate possibilities such as interviews, internships, graduate school applications, etc. In addition to a preliminary face-to-face meeting and a final culminating presentation session, students will participate online by responding to readings, discussion posts, and orchestrating an informational interview. 


Chemistry

  
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    CHE 1010 - Chemistry and Society



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics placement tests

    Description: This course is intended for nonscience students who need to satisfy the General Studies Science requirement. It introduces basic concepts of chemistry in modern society. The emphasis of the course is to permit students to obtain a qualitative understanding of chemical principles and their application to environmental issues.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
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    CHE 1100 - Principles of Chemistry



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): MTH 1110 or MTH 1210 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a study of the fundamentals of chemistry. A survey of atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, nomenclature, stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution chemistry is provided for those students with no background in these areas.

    Note: Completion of both CHE 1100 and CHE 1150 with passing grades is required to receive General Studies credit and GT-SC1.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    CHE 1150 - Principles of Chemistry Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading, writing, and mathematics preassessment placement tests.

    Corequisite(s): CHE 1100

    Description: This course is an introduction to the academic chemistry laboratory and is intended for students with no prior experience. The course will cover health and safety issues, preparation and use of common glassware/lab equipment, proper recording of qualitative and quantitative observations, and common lab techniques.

    Note: Completion of both CHE 1100 and CHE 1150 with passing grades is required to receive General Studies credit and GT-SC1.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    CHE 1800 - General Chemistry I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1110

    Description: A comprehensive study of the facts, concepts, and laws of chemistry. This course meets the requirements of students majoring in chemistry, medicine, medical technology, biology, physics and other fields requiring a strong background in chemistry. Students enrolling in this course should have successfully completed high school chemistry or equivalent coursework.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    CHE 1801 - General Chemistry I Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 1800

    Description: This course introduces basic laboratory techniques and reinforces and explores the concepts introduced in CHE 1800, General Chemistry I. Chemical literacy, including report writing, is introduced. Emphasis is placed on learning methods and technologies appropriate to a task, learning graphical, statistical, and symbolic methods to organize and interpret data, and understanding the role of repeatability in the acquisition of scientific data.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    CHE 1810 - General Chemistry II



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1800 and one of the following: MTH 1110, MTH 1120, MTH 1400, MTH 1410, MTH 2410, or MTH 2420

    Description: This course is a continuation of CHE 1800 and provides a comprehensive study of the facts, concepts, and laws of chemistry. The course meets the requirements of students majoring in such areas as chemistry, medicine, medical technology, biology, physics and other fields requiring a strong background in chemistry.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

  
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    CHE 1811 - General Chemistry II Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1801

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 1810

    Description: This course is the second semester of a one-year sequence in laboratory work that reinforces and explores the concepts introduced in CHE 1810, General Chemistry II. Chemical literacy, including report writing, is continued. Emphasis is placed on identifying relevant variables in experimental design and testing hypotheses. This course also reinforces learning methods and technologies appropriate to a task, learning graphical and statistical methods to interpret data, and understanding the role of repeatability in the acquisition of scientific data.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    CHE 2100 - Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1100

    Description: This course is a lecture-based study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course, in conjunction with CHE 2150, satisfies the requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

  
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    CHE 2150 - Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 2100

    Description: This course is a laboratory-based study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course, in conjunction with CHE 2100, satisfies the requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

  
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    CHE 2300 - Inorganic Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1800, CHE 1810, and CHE 1811

    Description: This course introduces and reviews such topics as bonding and reactivity of inorganic substances, acid-base concepts, descriptive chemistry of the main group elements, and transition elements/coordination chemistry. The laboratory deals with the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.

  
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    CHE 2710 - Introduction to Criminalistics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1100 or CHE 1800

    Corequisite(s): CHE 2711

    Description: This course introduces the student to the application of science at crime scenes and the crime laboratory. It provides a survey of forensic science including pathology, entomology, anthropology, microevidence, drug analysis, toxicology, dactyloscopy, firearm examination, serology, hair and fiber analysis, soil and glass analysis, and crime scene processing.

  
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    CHE 2711 - Introduction to Criminalistics Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1150 or CHE 1801

    Corequisite(s): CHE 2710

    Description: This course introduces the student to laboratory methods involved with presumptive tests for biological fluids, fire-arms examination, document examination, pattern analysis, and fingerprint examination.

  
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    CHE 2750 - Arson and Explosives



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1100

    Description: This course will include a study of the chemistry of fires and explosions. Arson scene evidence collection and preservation techniques will be discussed, as well as techniques for analyzing the residues collected.

  
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    CHE 2760 - Field Testing and Laboratory Analysis of Drugs



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1100

    Description: The course introduces the theory and practice of using a drug-testing kit to screen for the presence or absence of controlled substances.

  
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    CHE 3000 - Analytical Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810, CHE 1811, and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course studies the fundamentals of analytical chemistry including principles of gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric analysis. Chemical literacy as it applies to analytical chemistry will be introduced.

  
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    CHE 3010 - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810, CHE 1811, and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 3000

    Description: This course studies the fundamentals of analytical chemistry including principles of gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric analysis. Chemical literacy as it applies to analytical chemistry will be introduced.

  
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    CHE 3050 - Environmental Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810, CHE 1811, CHE 3100

    Description: This course is a study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in water, soil, air, and biota environments.

  
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    CHE 3090 - Survey of Organic Chemistry



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810, CHE 1811; and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Corequisite(s): CHE 3120

    Description: Survey of Organic Chemistry (CHE 3090) focuses on those areas of organic chemistry that are most pertinent to the study of Biochemistry (CHE 4310).  The course covers acid-base chemistry, stereochemistry, the chemistry of  alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and the chemistry of major metabolic pathways.

  
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    CHE 3100 - Organic Chemistry I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1800, CHE 1810, and CHE 1811

    Description: This is the first of a two-semester sequence covering organic chemistry. Topic coverage emphasizes basic organic systems ranging from saturated organic compounds (alkanes) to unsaturated compounds (alkenes, alkynes, aromatics), halogenated organic compounds, and basic organometallic systems. The class also covers basic reaction mechanisms and the fundamental electronic principles governing such transformations, as well as the synthesis of organic systems using the retrosynthetic method.

  
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    CHE 3110 - Organic Chemistry II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3120

    Description: This is the second of a two-semester covering organic chemistry. Topic coverage emphasizes basic heteronuclear systems, both saturated and unsaturated, and extends concepts learned in CHE3100 to significantly more complex electronic systems. The class continues the trend of functional group analysis from an electronic basis and an analysis of mechanisms and stereoelectronics as applied to the syntheses of organic systems.

  
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    CHE 3120 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810, CHE 1811, and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 3100 or CHE 3090

    Description: The focus of this course is an introduction to basic laboratory techniques of preparation, purification, and identification of organic compounds.

  
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    CHE 3130 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3100 and CHE 3120

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): Pre/Corequisite: CHE 3110

    Description: This course is a continuation of CHE 3120. It is a qualitative organic analysis course in which both classical and instrumental techniques are utilized to elucidate organic structure. Chemical literacy will be enhanced through the use of web based chemical literature search and American Chemical Society based report writing.

  
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    CHE 3190 - Survey of Physical Chemistry



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, MTH 1410, PHY 2010

    Description: This course provides a survey of the principles of thermodynamics, equilibrium, atomic/ molecular structure, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. It is designed to meet the requirements for the B.A. in Chemistry and the B.S. in Chemistry with the Criminalistics concentration.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHE or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3190
  
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    CHE 3200 - Survey of Physical Chemistry Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, MTH 1410, PHY 2010 or PHY 2311

    Description: This course covers laboratory explorations of key concepts in thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, and gas laws. Technical writing is emphasized; students are expected to use a personal computer to complete lab reports.

  
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    CHE 3250 - Physical Chemistry I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2420, PHY 2011 or PHY 2311; CHE 3000

    Description: This course is a comprehensive study of the principles of gas dynamics, thermodynamics, solution properties, kinetics, and a survey of electrochemistry and reaction dynamics. Literature searches related to historical and current topics in chemistry will be required.

  
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    CHE 3260 - Physical Chemistry II



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3250; PHY 2020 or PHY 2331

    Description: This course is a comprehensive study of the principles of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry, atomic structure, molecular structure, symmetry, and spectroscopy. Literature searches related to historical and current topics in chemistry will be required.

  
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    CHE 3280 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I



    Credits: 2

    Corequisite(s): CHE 3250

    Description: This course provides a laboratory study of the basic principles of gas dynamics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, and data-handling techniques. Technical report writing and literature search will be emphasized.

  
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    CHE 3290 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3280

    Corequisite(s): CHE 3260

    Description: This course provides a laboratory study of the basic principles of quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Technical report writing and literature search will be emphasized.

  
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    CHE 3600 - Crime Scene Investigation I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 2710 and CHE 2711

    Description: The course is designed for field investigators seeking a minor in criminalistics. Course material presented includes identification; individualization; collection and preservation of physical evidence; approach, processing, and investigation of crime scenes; establishing identity; trace evidence; impressions evidence; blood; and other biological evidence.

  
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    CHE 3610 - Crime Scene Investigation II



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3600

    Description: This course is a continuation of CHE 3600 for field investigators seeking a minor in criminalistics. Course materials include specialized instruction in the following topics: drugs and toxicology, arson and explosives, sexual assault investigation, burglary investigation, motor vehicle investigation, and homicide investigation.

  
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    CHE 3700 - Criminalistics I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, CHE 3010, CHE 3110, CHE 3130

    Description: This course introduces the theory and practice of forensic science with an emphasis on the chemical analysis and interpretation of physical evidence. Topics covered in lecture and/or laboratory include ethics, statistics, quality assurance, drug analysis, toxicology, and arson/explosives analysis.

  
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    CHE 3710 - Criminalistics II



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, CHE 3010, CHE 3110, CHE 3130

    Description: This course is an introduction to forensic biology/biochemistry including identification of body fluids with an indepth focus on the techniques and instrumentation used to extract, quantify and analyze DNA for forensics. The development of written and oral communication skills is emphasized.

  
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    CHE 3890 - Science and Public Policy: Variable Topics



    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite(s): Any lower-division science course and ENG 1010, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides a working familiarity with the technical issues that influence major public policy decisions. Policy issues and relevant technologies and their interactions are discussed. Course content varies according to current topics, such as health, environment, and energy.

    Note: This course may be repeated under different topics.

  
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    CHE 3980 - Internship in Chemistry



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): Major in chemistry; junior or senior status; permission of instructor

    Description: Supervised by a faculty member within the major department, internships provide practical, hands-on experience in a professional field related to the major. Internship placements must be established prior to enrollment in this course in consultation with the Applied Learning Center.

    To register with the Applied Learning Center, students must meet the following qualifications:

    • Completed at least one semester at MSU Denver
    • Sophomore, junior or senior status
    • Declared major in an undergraduate program
    • 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA at MSU Denver
    • Currently enrolled and taking classes at MSU Denver

    For information and instructions on finding and enrolling in an internship, contact the Applied Learning Center at 303-556-3290 or internships@msudenver.edu.

    Note: Variable Credit

  
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    CHE 4010 - Advanced Organic Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3110 and CHE 3260

    Description: This course provides an integrated study of techniques used for the investigation of organic reaction mechanisms and a survey of the nature of important organic reaction intermediates.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHE or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4010
  
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    CHE 4020 - Synthetic Organic Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3110, CHE 3130

    Description: This course covers a unified approach to classical and modern synthetic chemistry, including aspects of mechanism and stereochemistry.

  
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    CHE 4100 - Instrumental Analysis



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, CHE 3010, CHE 3100; CHE 3190 or CHE 3260

    Description: This course presents the theory and practice of instrumental methods of analysis. Topics include: electronics; atomic and emission spectroscopy; UV-VIS spectroscopy; fluorescence and phosphorescence spectrophotometry; emission and absorption spectroscopy; infrared spectrometry; Raman spectroscopy; NMR electro analytical methods; HPLC, GC, SPE, CE, and other chromatography methods.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHE or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4100
  
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    CHE 4110 - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3000, CHE 3010, CHE 3100, CHE 3110; CHE 3190 or CHE 3250

    Corequisite(s): CHE 4100

    Description: This course provides a laboratory study of instrumental methods employing electromagnetic radiation, magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography, and electrochemistry. Chemical literacy and report writing are emphasized.

  
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    CHE 4300 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing, CHE 3190 or CHE 3250, and completion of General Studies Requirements

    Description: This course is a capstone experience for students and provides an advanced study of topics relevant to the field of inorganic and organometallic chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, molecular orbital theory, symmetry, organometallic and inorganic reaction mechanisms.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHE or HON.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4300
  
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    CHE 4310 - Biochemistry I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3110 or CHE 3090

    Description: This course is an introduction to the chemistry of living systems with emphasis placed on proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, metabolism, and bioenergetics.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHE or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4310
  
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    CHE 4320 - Biochemistry II



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 4310

    Description: This course is a continuation of Biochemistry I. Students will engage in an in-depth study of the metabolism and function of lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids.

  
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    CHE 4350 - Biochemistry Laboratory



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3120

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CHE 4310

    Description: This course introduces the basic techniques and instrumentation of biochemical research. Students keep a laboratory notebook and write about their results in one or more laboratory reports, formatted in the style of an academic biochemistry journal.

  
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    CHE 4370 - Undergraduate Research in Chemistry



    Credits: 1-2

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 1810 and permission of instructor

    Description: Students will engage in a research project that involves the application of scientific methodology to chemical problems. Experience will be gained in literature searches, generating hypotheses, data collection, data handling, data analysis, safety and chemical hygiene, and presentation of results.

    Note: This course may be repeated. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward a major or minor in Chemistry or Biochemistry. Students interested in taking this course must consult with the Chemistry Department.

  
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    CHE 4650 - Chemistry Work Experience/Cooperative Education



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3010, CHE 3110

    Description: This course is a laboratory field experience for students majoring or minoring in chemistry. A total of 600 hours of work experience will be required.

  
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    CHE 4700 - Criminalistics Internship I



    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3710

    Description: This course is a laboratory internship experience for criminalistics majors.

  
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    CHE 4710 - Criminalistics Internship II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 3710

    Description: This course is a laboratory internship experience for chemistry majors with a concentration in criminalistics.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    CHE 4950 - Senior Experience in Chemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, CHE 3000, CHE 311, either CHE 3190 or CHE 3250, and completion of General Studies requirements.

    Description: This is a capstone experience for students seeking a major in chemistry. The course consists of library research in conjunction with a chemistry faculty member, concluding with the submission of a significant paper on some area of chemistry and a presentation of the paper to the Chemistry Department.

    Note: CHE 4950 can be used as a substitution for CHE 4960

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    CHE 4960 - Senior Experience in Biochemistry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing; CHE 3110; CHE 4310

    Description: This course is a capstone experience for students seeking a major in biochemistry. The course consists of library research in conjunction with a chemistry faculty member; the submission of a significant paper on some area of biochemistry; presenting the paper to the Chemistry Department; and completing the Diagnostic Undergraduate Chemistry Knowledge American Chemical Society examination.

    Note: CHE 4960 can be used as a substitution for CHE 4950

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Chicana and Chicano Studies

  
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    CHS 1000 - Introduction to Chicana/o Studies



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course introduces students to the broad range of the interdisciplinary field of Chicana/o Studies. The course covers the major historical moments beginning with an overview of Pre-Columbian civilizations in the Americas and Medieval Spain, which have led to the contemporary social location of Mexican-origin population within the United States. In addition, the course introduces students to the broad scope of Chicana/o cultural production in the creative arts such as visual, film, music and literature. Resources draw from various disciplines, including but not limited to: sociology, history, political science, anthropology, education, art and art history, women and gender studies, and religious studies.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 1003
  
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    CHS 2000 - Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or CHS 1020

    Description: This course traces the fusion of cultures and dialects of the Spanish-speaking Southwest into elements that characterize Chicano intracultural and intercultural diversity.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or ANT.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ANT 2360
  
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    CHS 2010 - Survey of Chicana/o Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 and ENG 1020, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course reviews major literary genres associated with Chicana/o and Latina/o creative expression from the 1800s to the present, including poetry, drama, and the novel.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or ENG.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH2

    Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 2410
  
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    CHS 2020 - Chicano Poetry and Drama



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 2010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is an intensive study of Chicano poetic and dramatic arts as they attempt to create a new reality. The course will also equip the student with a basic approach to poetry and drama as a craft through production.

  
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    CHS 2030 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods in Social Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): GWS 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or Permission of Instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of methods, analyses and critiques used by scholars to study social issues within and across a range of disciplines (e.g., history, arts, humanities, sciences, education, health, economics, law and social/ behavioral sciences). Research designs and general statistical interpretation will be reviewed for each methodology. Techniques for laboratory and field research, conducting qualitative and quantitative studies, and writing research reports will also be included.

    Note: Credit will be grade for only one prefix: GWS or AAS or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 2010, GWS 2010
  
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    CHS 2100 - Women of Color



    Credits: 3

    Description: Though U.S. women share much in common, their differences are salient to a thorough understanding of all these women's experiences. Comparative analysis of women's race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation are central to this course. The similarities among diverse groups of women are also examined in order to better understand the complexity of women's lives. The course addresses issues of work, health, interpersonal violence, globalization, as well as resistance, activism, and social change across identities.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, CHS, or GWS.

    (Course revised July 13, 2017)


    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 2100, GWS 2100
  
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    CHS 2110 - The Chicano in Aztlan



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on three major motifs associated with the socio-historical development of the Chicano in the Southwest: land, farm labor, and urban enclave.

  
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    CHS 2200 - Survey of Chicano/a Cultural Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000

    Description: This course introduces students to the inter- and trans-disciplinary approaches to recognizing, analyzing, constructing and deconstructing cultural texts. The course considers different kinds of cultural texts and ways of reading them from folktales, myths, music, monuments, rituals and games, to poems, novels, and political movements.

  
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    CHS 2500 - Borderland Studies: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000

    Description: This course examines the various expressions of borderland experiences through literature, film, religion, gender, immigration, music, and language.

    Note: This course may be repeated under different titles for up to 9 credits.

  
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    CHS 2600 - Chicana/o and Latina/o Religious Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course will engage aspects of Chicana/o and Latina/o religious experiences, practices, and expressions in the United States of America. While the course is grounded in Chicana/o religious experience, other Latina/o communities will also be discussed with emphasis on comparative aspects of the groups. Some attention will be given to historical contexts in Iberia and Latin America, as well as questions of how one studies Latina/o religions, but most of the course will examine moments in which religious expressions intersect with politics, popular culture, and daily life in the U.S.A.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or PHI.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PHI 2600
  
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    CHS 3000 - History of Meso-America: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Periods



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course examines the history of Meso-America and its relationship to the American Southwest from pre-Columbian times to 1836. Particular attention will be paid to the dynamism of indigenous peoples and the hybrid nature of the region's culture after the Spanish conquest.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3745
  
  •  

    CHS 3010 - The Mexican Revolution



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course traces the social, political, and economic forces that contributed to the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920). Furthermore, it provides a critical analysis of how leaders, women, the Mexican masses, and the U.S. influenced revolutionary events.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3830
  
  •  

    CHS 3020 - Chicana/o History, 1836 to the Present



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course concentrates on the era from the Texas Revolt in 1836 through the contemporary era of the 21st Century. This historical survey provides an overview of the Mexican population born and living in the Southwestern United States. Students will study complex racial, class, gender, regional, and generational identity issues affecting the intra-ethnic relations among Chicanas/os in the multicultural U.S. Special attention will be paid to Chicanos/as in Colorado history.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or HIS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3560
  
  •  

    CHS 3025 - Contemporary Chicana/o Art



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 and ENG 1020

    Description: This course is a survey of contemporary Chicana/o art. The historical, religious, social and political contexts of the artworks are studied. Students examine recurrent themes, icons, imagery, and forms within the historical timeline. This course may not be used as the sole art history elective for art studio majors.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or ARTH.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3360
  
  •  

    CHS 3100 - Social Justice and Activism in the Chicana/o Community



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000

    Description: This course is designed to provide in-depth sociological, historical and political analyses of community-based organizations, the process by which they originated, leadership styles, and information relative to their missions and functions within the Chicana/o community. Students will analyze theories regarding social change as they apply to social justice, activism and community organizing.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS, HON, or SWK.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3101, SWK 3110
  
  •  

    CHS 3200 - Chicanos and the Law



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or CJC 1010, or permission of instructor; and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course offers the student a complex understanding of the laws, the legal system, and how they relate to individual Chicanos and Chicano community rights. The dynamics of difference, cultural conflict with respect to race, and issues concerning ethnicity will be examined.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or CJC.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): CJC 3720
  
  •  

    CHS 3210 - The Chicano Family



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or permission of instructor; and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course provides an in-depth analysis of the Chicano family as a social institution. The course covers the social and economic history of the Chicano family in the Southwest and examines contemporary patterns of urban Chicano family life in a changing society.

  
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    CHS 3300 - Education of Chicano Children



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 2000

    Description: This course presents the Chicano perspective on current public education policy and its implementation in the schools. Examines learning and teaching differences in students and teachers.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or EDU.

    Cross Listed Course(s): EDU 3120
  
  •  

    CHS 3400 - The Chicano Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 2010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course deals with origins, themes, and techniques that characterize the Chicano novel. It is an in-depth study of the best examples of literary production in both Spanish and English.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or ENG. Suitable for non-English majors.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3480
  
  •  

    CHS 3401 - Art of Ancient Mesoamerica



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1600 with C- or better or CHS 1000; or permission of department

    Description: This course provides an overview of the arts and architecture produced by the different cultures of Mesoamerica, from the Olmec to the Aztec, as they existed before and up to the Spanish Conquest. The primary focus is on the visual elements of culture left to us, as well as any written records from both the Pre-Hispanic and Conquest periods. Through an exploration of these visual records, students examine the aesthetics and technologies of Mesoamerican cultures, as well as the cultural cosmologies and religious beliefs, political structures, and daily life which informed their production. Particular issues under discussion include cross-cultural contacts, the manipulation of power structures through imagery and architectural space, and the role of gender and social status in representation, politics, and religion.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3401
  
  •  

    CHS 3410 - Chicano Folklore of the Southwest



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 2000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course accents the study of oral and written folklore as a genre in Chicano history and culture. Its focus is upon tales, traditions, belief, and humor as a means to gain insight into what is culturally specific.

  
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    CHS 3460 - Chicana Feminisms



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or GWS 1001; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will provide students with a general background on Chicana feminist thought. Chicana feminism has carved out a discursive space for Chicanas and other women of color, a space where they can articulate their experiences at the intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality, among other considerations. In the process, Chicana feminists have critically challenged Chicano nationalist discourse as well as European and North American feminism. The course will address the diversity in thinking and methodology that defines these discourses thus acknowledging the existence of a variety of feminisms that occur within Chicana intellectual thought. The course will also explore the diversity of realms in which this feminist thinking is applied: labor, education, cultural production (literature, art, performance, etc.), sexuality, and spirituality, among others.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS, GWS or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): GWS 3550, HON 3460
  
  •  

    CHS 3481 - Latin American Modernisms



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTH 1700 with C- or better or CHS 1000; or permission of department

    Description: This course is an introduction to the development of modernism and postmodernism in Latin American art from 1910 to 1980. The course examines artists of differing periods and nationalities within a unifying thematic framework. These themes include: responses to the colonial past; nationalism and public art; indigenismo; folk/ popular arts; and relations with the European avant-garde. However, historical and geographic circumstances also provide a mechanism for distinguishing between individual artists and national or regional art movements. As a result the course examines distinct but intersecting manifestations of modernism within 20th century Latin America.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3481
  
  •  

    CHS 3600 - Mexico and Chicana/o Politics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course reviews the main approaches which have been utilized, in the past and in the present, to comprehend Mexico and Chicana/o politics.

  
  •  

    CHS 3660 - Women and Poverty



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 1010, SWK 1020 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course introduces the student to the relationship between gender and poverty and will examine the underlying causes of the "feminization of poverty" in the United States. Social, economic, age-based and ethnic factors will be explored in detail. The differences between prevailing stereotypes and current realities will be highlighted.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS, GWS, SOC, or SWK.

    Cross Listed Course(s): GWS 3660, SOC 3660, SWK 3660
  
  •  

    CHS 3700 - Psychology of Group Prejudice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or GWS 1001

    Description: This course covers psychological theory and research that examines causes, effects, expressions, and reduction of group prejudice. Various types of group prejudice are addressed, most notably prejudice against cultural and ethnic minorities in the United States (e.g., Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). Sexism and heterosexism also are discussed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 3700, GWS 3700, PSY 3700
  
  •  

    CHS 3800 - Topics in Chicano Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000, or permission of instructor; and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: Facilitates in-depth study of selected topics in Chicano studies.

  
  •  

    CHS 3801 - Mexico: History, Life, and Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): One year of Spanish or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is part of a study abroad program and provides an interdisciplinary understanding of Mexican civilization. It specifically deals with a social and historical approach to Mexican society and examines the traditions and institutions that shape the Mexican way of life.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CHS or MDL.

    Cross Listed Course(s): MDL 3800
  
  •  

    CHS 3870 - South American Peoples and Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or CHS 1000; or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course presents an ethnographic focus on the native peoples of South America. Students will analyze the daily cultural life of selected Indian peoples beginning at the point of contact in the 16th century, and the Spanish Colonial peoples of this time, to the present. Custom and tradition are studies in depth among Amazonian and Caribbean foragers, tribal groups of Patagonia, chiefdoms of the Andes inter-montane valleys, and the state-level civilizations of the high Andes. The cultural focus is in the context of the conquests of the European powers that struggled for domination of this highly diverse region.

 

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