Nov 30, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Elementary Education

  
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    EDU 4011 - Teaching Elementary School Social Studies



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 3444 or SED 3820; EDU 3445 or SED 3950

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4015, HIS 3425

    Description: This course focuses on concepts and instructional practices for teaching social studies in elementary schools. This includes methods for integrating history, geography, and the social sciences within a multicultural, global society. The use of primary sources and community resources is emphasized through development of a cross-curricular unit that employs pre- and post-assessments. These instructional practices are implemented in the co-requisite field experience.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    EDU 4015 - Field Experience: Teaching Elementary School Social Studies



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 3444 or SED 3820; EDU 3445 or SED 3950

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4011, HIS 3425

    Description: This field experience, as a partner with EDU 4010, requires 45 hours of :fieldwork at an assigned elementary school. Field work includes developing, teaching, and assessing a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary Social Studies lesson plans with appropriate differentiation and instructional technology. Use of constructivist, inquiry-based lessons is emphasized. Development of a pre-assessment with follow-up post-assessment is introduced.

  
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    EDU 4100 - Integrated Methods of Teaching Social Studies and Literacy: K-6



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): RDG 3110, EDU 3640, EDU 3650; EDU 3660, or ENG 4650

    Description: This course overviews integrated methods, materials, and curricula currently in use in elementary social studies and literacy education. Social studies concepts and skills will be explored within the framework of age-appropriate context and methods. The course will emphasize decision-making skills to foster the integration of diverse literacy skills within social studies disciplines (history, geography, economics, civics). Teacher candidates will incorporate state and national standards, use technology, develop an integrated unit which will include appropriate assessment strategies to evaluate instruction and learning.

    Note: Teacher candidates must take EDU 4105, a 55-hour field experience, and RDG 4000 concurrently with EDU 4100.

  
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    EDU 4105 - Field Experience: Integrated Social Studies and Literacy: K-6



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): RDG 3110, EDU 3640, EDU 3650; EDU 3660 or ENG 4650

    Description: This is a field experience taken concurrently with EDU 4100 and RDG 4000. Teacher candidates will spend 55 hours in a public school elementary classroom making instructional, assessment, and management decisions in reading, language arts and social studies in diverse contexts.

  
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    EDU 4115 - Residency I



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 4011, EDU 4015, and Senior Standing

    Corequisite(s): RDG 4444

    Description: This clinical residency requires three full, sequential instructional days per week in an assigned accredited public or private elementary classroom. The residency includes opportunities to synthesize content from all previous coursework, including: professionalism; designing, implementing, and assessing instruction; student motivation and engagement; and collaboration with colleagues and families. Application of this content is enhanced by the sequential teaching experience. The teacher candidate is an active participant in the elementary school community through close observation of the mentor teacher, collaborative practice with the mentor teacher, and/or supervised independent practice. Concepts and skills learned in RDG 4444 are a  particular focus in this residency.

  
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    EDU 4120 - Integrated Methods of Teaching Science, Health and Mathematics: K-6



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SCI 2610 MTH 2620, RDG 3110, EDU 3640, EDU 3650; EDU 3660 or ENG 4650

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): SCI 2620, MTL 3600

    Description: This course presents an overview of the integrated methods, materials, and curricula currently in use in elementary science, health, and mathematics education. Promotion of positive attitudes, gender equity, inquiry, discovery, and problem-solving techniques and strategies will be stressed. Teacher candidates will make decisions based on the diverse contexts of the classroom and pupils, incorporating state and national standards, including the appropriate use of technology and development of appropriate assessment strategies to support effective instruction.

    Note: Teacher candidates must take EDU 4125, a 55-hour field experience, concurrently.

  
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    EDU 4125 - Field Experience: Integrated Science, Health and Mathematics: K-6



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): SCI 2610, MTH 2620, RDG 3110, EDU 3640, EDU 3650; EDU 3660 or ENG 4650

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): MTL 3660, SCI 2620

    Description: This course is a field experience taken concurrently with EDU 4120. Teacher candidates will spend 55 hours in an elementary classroom practicing making instructional, assessment, and management decisions in mathematics, science, and health in the diverse contexts of a public school classroom.

  
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    EDU 4190 - Elementary Student Teaching and Seminar: K-6



    Credits: 6,12

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all requirements of the major and the elementary licensure program

    Description: This is a supervised, full-time field experience in an accredited public or private elementary school, providing increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervision, and assessment of learners (grades K-6). Ten hours of seminar are required (five hours for six credit course). To pass this course, and be recommended for licensure, teacher candidates must be minimally rated as proficient in all Performance-Based Standards for Colorado Teachers. Each student teacher is required to complete the Teacher Work Sample with all requirements rates as proficient or higher.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    EDU 4222 - Designing Instruction For All Learners



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 4115, RDG 4444

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4225

    Description: This course focuses on the knowledge and skills of data literate teachers, who can select and create valid and reliable assessments, critically analyze resultant assessment data, and plan instruction utilizing varied differentiation models to increase academic achievement for students with diverse learning needs. Attention is given to grouping strategies and management of the classroom environment for successful whole group, small group and individual instruction. Tracking individual and class performance through multiple measures and analyzing the success of differentiated instructional sequences is included. Teacher candidates apply these techniques in the co-requisite Residency II and reflect upon successes, challenges, and adaptations in practice with course peers.

  
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    EDU 4225 - Residency II



    Credits: 9

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 4115, RDG 4444

    Corequisite(s): EDU 4222

    Description: This culminating, full-time clinical residency will place the teacher candidate in an assigned, accredited public or private elementary school. Close collaboration between the candidate and mentor teacher will occur in a variety of ways, including the candidate taking the role of lead teacher. The candidate will assume responsibility for all functions of the classroom, including overall design and implementation of instruction and assessment in all curricular areas, maintenance of a productive classroom environment tailored to the needs of diverse learners, communication with colleagues and families, and integration of technology to improve student learning. Knowledge and skills gained in the corequisite EDU 4222 course concerning assessment, data, and use of specific instructional strategies for identified needs are practiced, and the teacher candidates evaluate these practices in light of class and individual academic achievement.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    EDU 4300 - Acting Like a Teacher



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of General Studies requirements in Oral Communication

    Description: This class examines and explores the formation of classroom presence using a variety of acting, speaking and vocal techniques to develop, build, and encourage skills supporting an effective classroom persona. Students will practice and demonstrate body movement, posture, and deportment skills along with verbal and nonverbal communication skills to support classroom management and motivate pupil attention and engagement. Students will identify, learn, and practice intentional vocal and visual techniques to make instructional communication more effective.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Course Revised February 8, 2017


    Cross Listed Course(s): CAS 4300, THE 4300
  
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    EDU 4510 - Development of Methods and Materials for Second Language/Bilingual/Bicultural Learning



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): EDU 3510 and satisfactory proficiency in Spanish reading, writing, listening, and speaking as determined by written and oral exams administered by MSU Denver Spanish-speaking faculty

    Description: This course is designed to help students identify appropriate integrated bilingual instructional materials aligned to Colorado model content standards in the areas of reading and writing, mathematics, science, social studies, health, and fine arts. It emphasizes planning, implementing, and evaluating integrated curriculum for the linguistically and culturally diverse student with alternatives in approaches and methodology. The course includes 15 hours of field experience in a bilingual classroom where students apply course concepts in real school settings.

  
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    EDU 4590 - Linguistically Diverse Student Teaching and Seminar



    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all requirements of the major, minor, linguistically diverse endorsement, teacher licensure program, and general studies

    Description: Satisfaction of all student teaching application requirements by the required deadline. Passage of the Linguistically Diverse PLACE test. Corequisite: In addition to taking EDU 4590 students must complete eight weeks of student teaching (EDU 4190, EDS 4290, or ECE 4390) in an elementary, secondary, or early childhood classroom working with a cooperating teacher in their initial licensure area. This course is a supervised, full-time, eight-week student-teaching experience in an accredited public or private school's linguistically diverse program. The experience provides increasing responsibility for the teaching, supervising, and directing of an identified group of English language learners, K-12. Teacher candidates must attend 10 hours of seminar conducted by college supervisors of student teaching. For this course, teacher candidates work with a linguistically diverse teacher and demonstrate proficiency in all phases of linguistically diverse classroom instruction. Teacher candidates are required to complete components of the teacher work sample and demonstrate proficiency in Performance Based Standards for Colorado Teachers as well as Colorado Linguistically Diverse Endorsement Standards. Proficiency required for recommendation for linguistically diverse endorsement includes ability to impact English language learners' academic success and to develop their English language proficiency.

  
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    EDU 4650 - Current Issues in Education: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced students in education

    Description: An in-depth examination of selected current topics and issues in education. Topics vary but all are of current importance, requiring the study of recent writings, research, and legislation.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

  
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    EDU 4700 - Substitute Teacher Workshop



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor's degree or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides the background knowledge, methods, techniques and materials for substitute teachers at the elementary and middle school levels to be more confident and competent substitute instructors.


English

  
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    ENG 1001 - Writing Studio A



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): Score of 50 or above on Sentence Skills Accuplacer and secondary placement

    Corequisite(s): ENG 1010

    Description: This one-hour lab provides supplemental academic instruction with an emphasis on the relationship of reading and grammar to writing.

  
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    ENG 1002 - Writing Studio B



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): Score of 50 or above on Sentence Skills Accuplacer and secondary placement

    Corequisite(s): ENG 1008 or ENG 1009

    Description: This two-hour lab provides supplemental academic instruction for international students or students who have completed their high school education outside the United States. This course emphasizes the relationship of reading and grammar to writing. It also explores the conventions of American academic writing and writing classes.

  
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    ENG 1008 - Stretch Composing Arguments A



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Score of 50 or better on the Accuplacer sentence skills exam AND a secondary placement score of 75

    Description: This course focuses on writing, rhetorical situations, and textual analysis. The course employs lecture, discussion, workshop, and conference methods. Students will learn how to critically read, summarize, engage and analyze texts. Students will demonstrate their ability to generate, organize, and produce writing for appropriate audiences. This semester is the first half of a two-semester sequence (ENG 1008 and ENG 1009) that is taught by a single professor and is a prerequisite for ENG 1020. This two-semester sequence is a study-and-process-intensive equivalent to ENG 1010. Coursework does not include library research. Students must receive a D or better to continue into ENG 1009.

  
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    ENG 1009 - Stretch Composing Arguments B



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of D or better in ENG 1008

    Description: This semester is the second half of a two-semester sequence (consisting of ENG 1008 followed by ENG 1009) that is taught by a single professor and is a prerequisite for English 1020. This two-semester sequence is a study­- and process- intensive equivalent to ENG 1010. This course focuses on writing, rhetorical situations, and textual analysis, building on foundations of the first semester of the course. The course employs lecture, discussion, workshop, and conference methods. Students will learn how to critically read, summarize, engage, and analyze texts. Students will demonstrate their ability to generate, organize, and produce writing for appropriate audiences. Coursework does not include library research. Students must receive a C- or better to earn General Studies, Composition credit. This semester is the second half of a two-semester sequence: ENG I 008 prepares the student for ENG 1009, and the two courses together serve as a prerequisite for English 1020.

    General Studies: Written Communication

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-CO1 Introductory Writing Course

  
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    ENG 1010 - Composing Arguments



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Score of 95 or higher on the Accuplacer sentence skills exam or a C- or better in ENG 090 or a score of 20-94 on Accuplacer with secondary placement. Students with an ACT ENG score of 18 or higher or SAT verbal score of 440 430 or higher or SAT Evidence-based Reading/Writing score of 470 or higher are exempt from the placement exam if scores are not older than five years.

    Description: ENG 1010 is a course focusing on the process of writing and revising college level texts in a variety of genres. The course employs lecture, discussion, workshop, and conference methods. Students learn how to read, summarize, and analyze texts. Students demonstrate their ability to generate, organize, and produce writing for appropriate audiences. Coursework does not include library research.

    Note: Students must receive a grade of "C-" or better to earn course credit.

    (Course revised July 13, 2017)


    General Studies: Written Communication

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-CO1

  
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    ENG 1020 - Research and Argument Writing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1009 with a grade of "C-" or better

    Description: This is a course in the process of writing extended essays supported by research. The course includes an introduction to research methods, practice in critical reading, thinking, and writing across the disciplines, integration of source material, and the conventions of MLA and APA styles of documentation. Students can expect to do a series of shorter writing and research assignments leading to the longer, documented paper.

    Note: Because of continual development in research technology and techniques, credits ten years or older, from any institution, will not transfer. ENG 1020 requires a grade of C- or better to fulfill the General Studies requirement.

    General Studies: Written Communication

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-CO2

  
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    ENG 1021 - Honors Research and Argument Writing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1009 with a grade of C- or better; Student in the Honors program or approval by the Honors Director

    Description: This is a course for students in the Honors Program and addresses the process of writing extended essays supported by research. The course includes an introduction to research methods, practice in critical reading, thinking, and writing across the disciplines, integration of source material, and the conventions ofMLA and APA styles of documentation. Students can expect to do a series of shorter writing and research assignments leading to the longer, documented paper and will write reflectively on their writing process.

    Note: Because of continual development in research technology and techniques, credits ten years or older, from any institution, will not transfer. ENG 1021 requires a grade of C- or better to fulfill the General Studies requirement.

    General Studies: Written Communication

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-CO2 Intermediate Writing Course

  
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    ENG 1100 - Introduction to Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This is a general studies course in the understanding and analysis of literary genres, including fiction, drama, and poetry.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH2

  
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    ENG 1120 - Introduction to Drama



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course is intended for non-English majors who wish to study plays representing different genres and periods from a modern perspective.  In this course in the history and appreciation of drama, elements of theatre, major movements in drama, and representative works will be studied.  Students will read, view, and write about plays to improve their understanding of drama and its place in culture.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH2

  
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    ENG 2000 - Introduction to Textual Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: In this course, students study diverse texts in literature, film, graphic novels, linguistics, and rhetoric from a critical perspective appropriate to the large field of English studies and aimed at developing critical-thinking skills for new reading and writing situations emerging in the twenty-first century. Students learn to analyze forms and uses of language across a variety of media, employing strategies of close textual explication and application of critical perspectives, while exploring the impact of written and visual discourses in shaping ideas, identities, and social values.

  
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    ENG 2010 - Introduction to Linguistics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides the basic analytic skills to view language from a variety of perspectives.  In addition to studying language structure (phonology, morphology, and syntax), the students will discover how languages around the world differ from one another, how children acquire language, how animal communication is distinct from human language, how people use language as a form of social identity, and how languages change over time.  Much of the course involves solving mini-language problems and discussing the relevance of language to our daily lives.

  
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    ENG 2100 - Introduction to Literary Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 or permission of instructor

    Description: Designed primarily for English majors and minors, this course provides an introduction to literary studies. Students learn the terminology, analytical skills, and critical approaches of the discipline. Students read, discuss, and write about literature from a variety of cultures and identities, including national, ethnic, gender, and GLBTQ.

  
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    ENG 2110 - World Literature: Beginnings to 1600



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course surveys literature in translation composed and/or written before 1600 by men and women in Europe, Asia, and Africa. The study of this literature is supported through discussion of geography, cultural interaction, and cultural change over time.

  
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    ENG 2120 - World Literature: 1600 to Present



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course surveys literature in translation composed and/or written after 1600 by authors in Europe, Asia, and Africa. The study of this literature is supported through discussion of geography, cultural interaction, and cultural change over time.

  
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    ENG 2150 - Legends of Troy



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course studies the literature of the epic war between the Greeks and the Trojans. We read literature from ancient Greek and Roman sources and consider such characters as Achilles, Paris, Helen, Odysseus, and Hercules, and the groups connected with them: the Amazons, the Argonauts, the Spartan armies, and the Roman Legions. Students also consider the legacy of this war in popular culture: graphic novels, movies, and video games.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

  
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    ENG 2210 - American Literature: Beginnings through the Civil War



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course surveys literatures by diverse voices, written in America from the Pre-Colonial Era to the Civil War, including poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction. Students read, analyze, and write about pre-Colonial, Colonial, Enlightenment, Reform, Romantic, and Transcendental American literatures.

  
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    ENG 2220 - American Literature: Civil War to Present



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course surveys literature by diverse voices written in America from the Civil War to the present, including poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction. Students read, analyze, and write about Realist, Naturalist, Modernist, and Postmodernist American literature.

  
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    ENG 2240 - Native American Literatures



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course studies the oral and written literatures of Native Americans in the context of historical, political, and social conditions of the time that they were produced. It is suitable for non-English majors.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    ENG 2270 - Monsters and Monstrosity



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course offers an introduction to the practices of literary studies through the theme of monsters and monstrosity. Considering examples from different genres, media (such as literature, film, graphic novels), and time periods, students analyze the cultural significance of the monster in the many forms it may take and explore the ways in which creative works, through such figures as the monster, represent and rethink realities (social, cultural, scientific, human) through the blurring of the real and the imaginary.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

  
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    ENG 2310 - British Literature: Beginnings to the late 1700s



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course studies the development of the language, literary forms, and themes of the writers of England from the Anglo-Saxon period through the late 1700s. It considers innovations in literary style, the role of literature in articulating the philosophies and concerns of a culture, the historical background of each period, and linguistic change. Students will develop skills in analyzing, discussing, and writing about literature of the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Early Modem, Restoration, and Enlightenment periods.

  
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    ENG 2330 - British Literature: Late 1700s to the Present



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course studies the development of literary forms and themes of British literature from the late 1700s to the present. It considers innovations in literary style, the way literature articulates the philosophies and concerns of a culture, and the historical background of each period. Students develop skills in analyzing, discussing, and writing about Romantic, Victorian, Modern, Postmodern and Contemporary British literature.

  
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    ENG 2340 - Shakespeare and Popular Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: In this course, students study plays by Shakespeare and their adaptation to other media such as film, visual art, and the graphic novel. Students read, view, and write about plays and their adaptations to other media to improve their understanding of Shakespeare plays and their place in contemporary culture. This course is intended for non-English majors.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

  
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    ENG 2410 - Survey of Chicana/o Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 and ENG 1020, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course reviews major literary genres associated with Chicana/o and Latina/o creative expression from the 1800s to the present, including poetry, drama, and the novel.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH2

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 2010
  
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    ENG 2450 - Women's Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course introduces students to women authors; to images of women in fiction, drama, and poetry; and to feminist literary criticism. Works by women of color are included. It has an historical perspective with most reading on British and United States women, particularly those writing in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. The focus will be on the ways in which literature by women in any tradition is affected by their gender.

  
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    ENG 2460 - Introduction to Children's Literature for Non-English Majors



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is intended for non-English majors who have a general interest in the subject of children's literature, that is, writing intended for an audience ranging from pre-readers to early adolescents. The course will survey the genres and the history of such literature, including various oral traditions and current issues. Students will develop their abilities to understand, analyze, appreciate, and critique children's literature.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-AH2

  
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    ENG 2500 - Art and Craft of Writing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students will write in a variety of genres (e.g., fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction), using a recursive process and a workshop setting to revise, edit, and polish their works to final drafts. Students will study writing theory and sample texts to inform the structure, style, and literary qualities of their own writing.

  
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    ENG 2505 - Rhetoric of War



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: In this course, students explore different representations of war and how these representations affect our views of soldiers, citizens, and society.   Students analyze texts, such as letters, memoirs, art, film, poetry and literature, in order to discuss different forms of representation concerning war, and multiple perspectives of war.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

  
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    ENG 2510 - Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an introduction to written Rhetoric and Composition. Students will be introduced to major figures in history of the field of written rhetoric and composition. Students will consider the terminology, traditions, critical approaches, and controversies of written composition and rhetoric as the field evolves in the 21st Century.

  
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    ENG 2810 - Vampire Films



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: In this course students learn about vampire traditions in Western cultures and how they have evolved from the late middle ages to the present in written and cinematic forms. The emphasis is on theatrical-released film representations of those traditions, including their intercultural origins and their transmission across national and cultural boundaries.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities, Global Diversity

  
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    ENG 2850 - International Film



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course introduces the study of films, using classics of international cinema.  Students study national cinemas, important movements, and critical trends, as well as themes, styles, and important figures relevant to each era/movement/national cinema. Students study representative films and the larger culture represented in those films.  Students learn a film vocabulary that will enable them to articulate critical responses and write analytical, evaluative critiques.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities, Global Diversity

  
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    ENG 2860 - Introduction to Cinema Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or permission of the instructor

    Description: In this course students study cinema as culture and art form, both on-screen and in written critique. The emphasis is on learning the fundamentals of film language, including mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound, so that students can produce critical writing of their own. Films studied represent diverse perspectives, eras, styles, and nationalities; those films not from Anglophone cultures are screened with English subtitles.

  
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    ENG 3011 - Analyzing English



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a practical approach to English language structure (i.e. phonology, morphology, and syntax), particularly useful to prospective teachers of English.  The purpose of the course is to create a stronger understanding of the linguistic diversity in today's society. The course requires students to describe and explain linguistic structures.

  
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    ENG 3020 - History of the English Language



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides a study of both the internal history (sounds, inflections, and syntax) and the external history (political, social, and cultural influences) which have combined to make the English language in its many varieties what it is today.

  
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    ENG 3030 - Semantics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is the study of meaning in natural language. Students examine the development of meaning, the significant linguistic units that carry meaning, and the ways people use language to convey meaning. The course deals with basic concepts, theories, and analytical techniques in contemporary linguistics.

  
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    ENG 3050 - Language and Society



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course examines the dynamic relationships between language and society. The students will investigate why people speak differently in different social contexts by identifying the social functions of language and the ways in which language is used to convey social meaning. The course focuses on language variation, including such topics as languages and dialects, pidgins and creoles, bilingualism and multilingualism, linguistic solidarity and politeness, language planning and language change. Field methods, including ethical research procedures, are an integral part of the course.

  
  •  

    ENG 3070 - Old English



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: ENG 2010, ENG 3011, ENG 3020, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the basic vocabulary and grammar needed to read texts in Old English with the aid of reference materials.  The grammatical structure of the language is studied in detail.  The course also addresses the relevant cultural and historical contexts necessary for understanding Old English texts.

  
  •  

    ENG 3073 - Old Norse



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: ENG 2010, ENG 3011, ENG 3020, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the basic vocabulary and grammar needed to read texts in Old Norse with the aid of a glossary. It also addresses the relevant cultural and historical context necessary for understanding the texts.

  
  •  

    ENG 3075 - Latin



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: ENG 2010, ENG 3011, ENG 3020, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the basic vocabulary and grammar needed to read texts in Latin with the aid of reference materials. The grammatical structure of the language is studied in detail. The course also addresses the relevant cultural and historical contexts necessary for understanding Latin texts.

  
  •  

    ENG 3100 - Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students will read, analyze, and write about major works by Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, and John Milton.  Students will study characteristics of Middle and Early Modern English, political and social environments in which the texts were written, and their critical legacies.

  
  •  

    ENG 3110 - Selected Literary Periods: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course studies representative texts of a specific literary period. Readings will include primary literature of the period, as well as materials exploring the literature's contexts.

    Note: This course may be repeated under different topics for up to 9 credits maximum.

  
  •  

    ENG 3118 - Postcolonial Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course introduces students to selected literatures from formerly colonized countries. With reference to critical theories of postcolonialism, students examine texts that represent the complex social, political, linguistic, economic, and cultural dynamics that exist or have existed between colonized regions and colonizing powers. As students master the vocabulary of postcolonial studies, using this critical framework will develop their critical and interpretive skills as readers of world literature.

  
  •  

    ENG 3150 - Development of European Epic



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course traces and analyzes the development of the epic genre, focusing particularly on works produced in Medieval and Early Modern Western Europe, from the Celtic and Germanic heroic cultures and oral formulaic tradition through the development of later Medieval and Early Modern verse and prose epics. The course covers the important literary modes, tropes and themes prevalent in the epic genre; relevant historical and cultural factors in the development of different epic modes; relationships to the Classical period; and critical/theoretical approaches to the genre. Non-English texts are read in translation.

  
  •  

    ENG 3210 - Development of American Drama



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of the instructor

    Description: Students read and analyze dramas and critical texts, tracing the development of American drama from the late eighteenth century to the present. The course provides instruction in historical and cultural contexts, dramatic techniques, and critical and theoretical views of the dramas. Students locate, study, and apply literary criticism appropriate to individual texts in their own written literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3230 - Development of the American Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students read and analyze novels and critical texts, tracing the development of American novels from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The course provides instruction in historical and cultural contexts, narrative techniques, and critical and theoretical views of the novels. Students locate, study, and apply literary criticism appropriate to individual texts in their own written literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3240 - African American Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or AAS 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students read, analyze, and write about various forms of literature produced by African Americans with consideration of historical and social contexts. Course content includes oral tradition, slave narratives, Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts movement, and contemporary literature.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or AAS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 3240
  
  •  

    ENG 3280 - Development of American Poetry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 and junior-level standing, or permission of the instructor

    Description: In this course, students trace and analyze the development of American poetry from the beginning to the present. The course focuses on the reading and analysis of poetry, covering historical contexts, philosophical and cultural trends, poetic techniques, and critical and theoretical perspectives.

  
  •  

    ENG 3310 - Development of British Drama: Medieval through 19th Century



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students read, analyze, and write about important British dramatic works from the Medieval period to the 19th century. Students study plays and playwrights with an emphasis on trends of development and the importance of British drama to the broader contexts of literature and culture.

  
  •  

    ENG 3320 - Development of Modern and Contemporary British Drama



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course traces and analyzes the development of dramatic works from British writers from the late 1800s to the present. Students read, analyze, and write about dramatic works with consideration of historical contexts, social pressures, and cultural trends that influence the literature. Students study plays from theatrical movements such as Early Realism, Theatre of the Absurd, Experimental Theatre, and Social Realism, including plays by women and minority playwrights. Students will apply literary criticism to plays in written literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3330 - Development of the British Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students read and analyze fiction, tracing the development of British novels written in English from the late 1600s to the present. The course provides instruction in historical contexts, economic/material constraints of publishing, narrative techniques, and critical and theoretical analyses of the novels. Students locate, study, and apply literary criticism appropriate to individual texts in written literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3360 - LGBT Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or GWS 1200

    Description: Students read, analyze, and write about various forms of literature produced by and about the LBGT experience with consideration of historical and social contexts. Course content includes important LBGT writers in a variety of literary periods and cultures, critical readings on LGBT history and pertinent theory, and explore how historical contingencies and political debates inform literature, as well as how literature and culture inform and challenge public and political opinion.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or GWS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): GWS 3430
  
  •  

    ENG 3370 - Contemporary World Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course introduces students to literature from the world outside British and American cultural traditions. Readings focus on fictional narratives originating in regions such as Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, Latin America, and Continental European literature. Students expand their knowledge of different cultures, acquire theoretical understanding of postcolonial issues since the mid-twentieth century, and enhance their skills in reading and interpreting literatures from other parts of the world.

  
  •  

    ENG 3380 - Development of Modern European Drama



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students will read, analyze, and write about important dramatic works written from the late-19th Century to the present. Students will study plays by European playwrights with an emphasis on trends of development.

  
  •  

    ENG 3400 - Development of Modern Poetry



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students study poetry from the Modern period: the mid-19th century through World War II. Students read, analyze, and write about poetry and poetic theory. Attention will be given to locating and understanding literary criticism appropriate to individual texts and using that analysis in the writing of the researched literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3410 - Development of the European Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course students trace and analyze the development of European novels from the 1600s to the present. The course focuses on the reading and analysis of extended pieces of fiction, covering historical contexts, philosophical and cultural trends, narrative techniques, and critical and theoretical perspectives relevant to the analysis of the European novelistic form, with attention to the location, study, and application of literary criticism appropriate to individual texts in written literary analysis. Texts will be read in translation.

  
  •  

    ENG 3420 - The English Bible as Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of the instructor

    Description: This course is a critical study of the Bible in English translation with emphasis on the literary forms and cultural contexts of the books of the Bible from the Hebrew Bible through the New Testament. Students examines the historical contexts, narrative techniques, development of canonical versus non-canonical biblical text, and critical and theoretical evaluations of the Bible as a work of literature, with attention to locating and understanding literary criticism appropriate to individual texts and using those resources in the writing of researched literary analysis.

  
  •  

    ENG 3430 - Classical Mythology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of the instructor

    Description: Students read, analyze, and write about ancient Greek and Roman mythology as expressed in translations of enduring works of Classical literature. The course provides instruction in historical contexts, narrative techniques, and critical evaluations of Classical mythology. Students locate, study, and apply literary criticism appropriate to individual texts in written literary analysis.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3430
  
  •  

    ENG 3435 - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greek and Roman Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students explore the expression of gender in Ancient Greek and Roman literature, wherein gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines are defined by their gender and sexuality. Using critical and theoretical approaches appropriate to the study of treatments of gender and sexuality in literary texts, students will read, analyze, discuss, and write about Greek and Roman literature.

  
  •  

    ENG 3440 - Myth and Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course examines major mythological texts, including Greek, Roman, Hebrew, Christian, and non-Western, and their influences on literature. Students consider the intertextuality of myths and their reinterpretations in later literature. Students also study relevant literary theory and criticism.

  
  •  

    ENG 3461 - Analyzing Children's Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course studies various levels and types of children's literature with attention to applying literary theory to the analysis of children's literature. The course traces the connected historical development of concepts of childhood and children's literature. Students analyze and critique various works of children's literature across a number of time periods, modes, and genres.

  
  •  

    ENG 3470 - Young Adult Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: This course provides a comprehensive critical survey of various types and genres of contemporary young adult literature. It focuses on issues relating to selection, culture, gender, diversity, and response to and analysis of literature in both print and non-print forms.

  
  •  

    ENG 3475 - Affirming Diverse Voices in Literature in the Secondary Education Classroom



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 and Junior-level standing or permission of instructor

    Description: This is a course in the study of the representative works by people of color and diverse ethnicities most frequently taught in the secondary classroom. Students will study critical theory and literary influences.

  
  •  

    ENG 3480 - The Chicano Novel



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 2010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course deals with origins, themes, and techniques that characterize the Chicano novel. It is an in-depth study of the best examples of literary production in both Spanish and English.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or CHS. Suitable for non-English majors.

  
  •  

    ENG 3500 - Studies in Rhetoric and Writing: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing

    Description: This course offers specialized rhetorical and critical studies of a particular expository form or theme, focusing on the written form. Coursework may incorporate lectures, selected textual studies, group discussion, writing workshops, and supervised projects.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit under different titles. Each course variant may be taken for credit only once.

  
  •  

    ENG 3501 - Studies in Rhetoric and Writing: Style



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or ENG 2510

    Description: This course focuses on the rhetorical, social, cultural, and political contexts of writing styles and style guides. Coursework may incorporate lectures, selected textual studies, group discussion, workshops, and supervised projects.

  
  •  

    ENG 3503 - Rhetoric and Visual Literacy



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or ENG 2500 or ENG 2510

    Description: The course is a study on visual literacy and writing through the analysis of how text, through rhetoric, both cultivates and restricts the formation of power, identity, and community. Students analyze the material environment, such as film and new media, clothes, furniture, food, music, signage, tools, toys, and other objects, as rhetorical fields of persuasive appeals and how they influence, liberate, and constrain the formation of identity and community.

  
  •  

    ENG 3505 - Concepts of Authorship



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or ENG 2500 or ENG 2510

    Description: This course examines Western concepts of authorship and originality. Topics include copyright and intellectual property law, collaborative authorship, theories of invention, and contemporary challenges to the idea of solitary authorship, including the Internet, the writing workshop, writing centers, and workplace writing practices.

  
  •  

    ENG 3506 - Academic Editing and Composing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: Students learn the principles of editing and composing documents for diverse academic audiences. Students work with a variety of documents, including scholarly and academic papers, conference talks, scholarly blogs, and book reviews, to explore how editing shapes texts with regard to content, format, style, tone, grammar, punctuation, and mechanics.

  
  •  

    ENG 3507 - Writing Reviews and Criticism



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or ENG 2500 or ENG 2510

    Description: In this course, students learn the basics of writing reviews and criticism, focusing on purposes, conventions, and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on writing literature reviews, book reviews, and reviews of other cultural artifacts, including film, food, and art, for both scholarly and popular audiences.

  
  •  

    ENG 3510 - Composition Studies: Theories and Practice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 and junior standing, or permission of instructor

    Description: This class is a study of the theoretical foundations of writing and writing processes, focusing on writing as both a personal and a social act. Students apply theories of writing to their own processes and in tum learn how writing works. Students develop their own theory of composing based on reading and practical application in composition studies.

  
  •  

    ENG 3520 - Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2510

    Description: This course introduces students to the types of research methods used in rhetoric and composition. Students explore what types of questions are answered by different types of research methodologies and how empirical studies in rhetoric and composition are designed. Methodological issues such as data collection, coding, validity, and reliability are considered, as well as participant rights and protections and other ethical issues. Students design an empirical study.

  
  •  

    ENG 3521 - Poetry Writing Workshop



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100, and ENG 2500, or permission of instructor

    Description: Students in this writing workshop will be introduced to the major conventions of poetry writing while writing their own poems. Students will practice generating, drafting, editing, polishing, and revising each poem. The class will include peer workshops and poetry readings.

  
  •  

    ENG 3522 - Fiction Writing Workshop



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100, and ENG 2500, or permission of instructor

    Description: Students will learn, develop, and practice fiction writing. Writing assignments will focus on the development of plot, character, theme, setting, and voice. The course will focus not only on the craft necessary to develop a marketable narrative, but also on the tools needed to build a challenging and supportive workshop environment.

  
  •  

    ENG 3523 - Drama Writing Workshop



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2500 or THE 2210 or permission of the instructor

    Description: This course introduces the basics of playwriting style and structure. Writing assignments focus on crafting dialogue, developing characters, and structuring effective plots. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative nature of playwriting, with its ultimate goal of public performance.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or THE.

    Cross Listed Course(s): THE 3523
  
  •  

    ENG 3524 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100, and ENG 2500, or permission of instructor

    Description: This class includes the study and writing of creative nonfiction and its subgenres, e.g., literary memoir, personal essay, literary journalism, nature writing, and literary travel writing, through group discussions and supervised workshops, developing their writing processes. Students in this writing workshop will be introduced to the major conventions of creative nonfiction while writing their own pieces and participating in peer workshops.

  
  •  

    ENG 3525 - Professional and Scholarly Writing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021, Junior-level standing, or permission of the instructor

    Description: Students explore the expectations that shape scholarly writing in their various disciplines and employ the correct forms, interpret and synthesize the literature, and presentment of their researched writing to various audiences. Students draw on research appropriate for discipline-specific publications and/or conference presentations. During this course, students learn to transform their work into publishable articles with the guidance of instructor feedback and peer review.

    General Studies: Written Communication

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-CO3

  
  •  

    ENG 3570 - Songwriting



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course introduces the basic aesthetic and communicative concepts of songwriting with regard to tradition and to contemporary trends and enables students to articulate a conscious method appropriate to their own aesthetic approaches to songwriting in the context of traditional songwriting. Students compose original songs with various features (lyrics, melody, harmony, etc.) and document them so that each song may be communicated and performed in various different genres, styles, and situations.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    (Course created July 13, 2017)


    Cross Listed Course(s): MUS 3240
  
  •  

    ENG 3610 - Theories of Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100

    Description: Students in this course read major texts in the history of literary criticism, from the Greeks to the present. Students learn to distinguish among various theories and critical strategies, and to apply them to literature. Course work includes advanced study of some literary work and critical writing about it. This course is required for English majors in the Literature concentration.

  
  •  

    ENG 3620 - Perspectives in Literary Criticism: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 and Junior-level Standing

    Description: This course studies representative texts of a specific critical perspective (such as structuralism, historicism, materialist criticism, feminist/gender criticism, racial/ethnic identity) applied in literary analysis. Readings include critical and theoretical texts working in the selected critical mode, as well as primary literary texts representing a variety of contexts through which the particular critical perspective may be applied and explored.

  
  •  

    ENG 3621 - Gender Theory



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 and Junior-level Standing

    Description: In this course, students explore gender theory in literary studies, from its roots in feminist theory to the development of queer theory, considering differences and points of intersection between feminist, gender, and queer theory perspectives. Readings include critical and theoretical texts representative of the variety of approaches and issues that emerge within gender-related theory, as well as literary texts, from a variety of contexts, through which to consider the perspectives and issues of literary analysis based in questions of gender.

  
  •  

    ENG 3670 - Writing Center Theory and Practice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021

    Description: This course familiarizes students with theories of how writing is learned and taught. Students study composition theory, revision strategies, ethnographic research strategies, different styles of learning, and a variety of tutoring methods. Students apply what they have learned by observing, analyzing, and reflecting on tutoring sessions and on the tutoring process. Communications and English majors or minors or students who have a special interest in writing, tutoring and/or teaching are preferred.

  
  •  

    ENG 3700 - Literature and the Law



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020 or ENG 1021 and junior-level standing or permission of the instructor

    Description: The course examines issues of law, justice, and equity through analyses of literary works, their social and historical contexts, and relevant critical approaches. Students read, analyze, and write about literary texts concerned with legal issues.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ENG or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3701
  
  •  

    ENG 3711 - History of Cinema I: Beginning to 1938



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2860

    Description: This course will examine the history of cinema from its 19th-century origins until the introduction of sound films in the 1920s through 1938. Students explore important developments and influences in American and international cinema, including the creation of realistic and fantastic styles, the formation of Hollywood narrative, the impact of vaudeville and stage theatre, the emergence of film genres, melodrama, the contributions of women in early cinema, the place of race film, and the evolution of classical editing and dialectical montage.

  
  •  

    ENG 3712 - History of Cinema II: 1939 to Present



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2680

    Description: This course will examine the history of cinema from 1939 to the present. Students explore important developments and influences in American and international cinema, including Classical Hollywood Cinema, Italian Neorealism, Film Noir, the French New Wave, European Art Cinema, New German Cinema, the Hollywood transition years, the emergence of other important national cinemas, and the influence of new technologies, including special effects and digital filmmaking.

  
  •  

    ENG 3720 - Studies in Cinema: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2860 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course students examine a grouping of cinematic productions in their historical, cultural, national, regional, and/or other general contexts. Films are grouped based on considerations such as national cinemas (e.g., Indian Cinema); regional cinemas (e.g., African Cinema); type (e.g., short films); category (e.g., film trilogies); and other topics as defined by the specific syllabus. Films are screened during laboratory hours.

    Note: This course may be repeated under different topics for up to 9 credits.

  
  •  

    ENG 3721 - Cinema of India



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2860 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students examine what makes the movies of lndia distinctive. Although the emphasis is on films associated with the term Bollywood, some Indian films from outside the mainstream Bollywood tradition are also included, such as an independent film, a Bengali regional film, a diasporic IndoCanadian film, a documentary film, an animated film. Studies include readings in film criticism that address issues of cinematic form and cultural context. ENG 2860 recommended.

 

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