Oct 03, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Communication Studies

  
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    CAS 3980 - Internship in Communication Studies



    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1010 and Instructor Approval

    Description: This course provides students an internship experience working in any one of a broad range of jobs and careers. Student interns' positions and experiences develop communication skills and aptitudes in real-world occupational and organizational settings. Student interns work with both site supervisors and faculty mentors.

  
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    CAS 4030 - Advocacy and Social Justice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students examine social advocacy from the communication perspective. Emphasis is placed on communication styles and the premises associated with a social justice sensibility, informed by communication theory and applied communication practices. Students identify a social justice problem in the local community, design an intervention, and engage the community with various communication strategies and techniques. The class combines classroom instruction with coordinated, integrated, and structured volunteer service.

  
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    CAS 4080 - Rhetorical Criticism



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1010 and junior/senior standing, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the historical and critical methodologies for analyzing rhetorical efforts, both from the points of view of an intellectual discipline and as a practical art in a democratic society.

  
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    CAS 4100 - Techniques of Persuasion



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2301 or CAS 3090 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course investigates the factors that influence individuals and groups through the media of persuasive rhetorical campaigns. This course involves specific investigation and analysis of twentieth century persuasive campaigns. Students will have opportunities to study and develop persuasive campaigns in various rhetorical areas.

  
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    CAS 4120 - Freedom of Speech



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1010, ENG 1010, ENG 1020, and senior standing; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a study of the historical and social influences with inquiry into the legacy of our inherited rights to free speech. This course examines the first amendment's clause on freedom of speech and the press, threats to this freedom and special inquiry into contemporary issues and cases.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    CAS 4160 - Advanced Organizational Communication



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2160

    Description: Organizations and organizational communication occur within a broader systematic framework embedded in social, economic, political, and cultural contexts. This course explores global organizational communication that contributes to sustainable and healthy organizational environments and organizational success. The healthy organization of the 21st century fosters well-being in employees while simultaneously meeting fiduciary, societal, and ethical responsibilities.

  
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    CAS 4200 - Gender in Popular Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2770

    Description: This course examines popular culture as a mechanism of mediated communication and explores how the forces of popular culture interact with ideas of gender. This course investigates and analyzes issues relevant to representations of gender in popular culture, including constructions of identity, femininity and masculinity, sexuality, and expectations regarding home, work, and family.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CAS or GWS

    Cross Listed Course(s): GWS 4200
  
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    CAS 4300 - Acting Like a Teacher



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfaction of General Studies requirements in Oral Communication

    Description: This class examines and explores the formation of classroom presence using a variety of acting, speaking and vocal techniques to develop, build, and encourage skills supporting an effective classroom persona. Students will practice and demonstrate body movement, posture, and deportment skills along with verbal and nonverbal communication skills to support classroom management and motivate pupil attention and engagement. Students will identify, learn, and practice intentional vocal and visual techniques to make instructional communication more effective.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Course Revised February 8, 2017


    Cross Listed Course(s): EDU 4300, THE 4300
  
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    CAS 4301 - Communication Ethics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CAS 3301

    Description: This course identifies key perspectives in communication ethics. Topics include civility, morality/integrity, duty, the self as an ethical agent, organizational ethics, and media ethics. Students will apply traditional ethical principles to a variety of communication contexts including interpersonal, small group, team, organizations, and mediated situations.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CAS or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4301
  
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    CAS 4310 - Trends in Communication Studies: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1010 and CAS 1301

    Description: The purpose of this special topics course is to introduce students to an in depth discussion of issues or research within the field of communication studies. The course may be taken for up to 9 credit hours under different titles.

  
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    CAS 4410 - The Denver Media Roadshow



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400

    Description: This field research course offers students the opportunity for guided, onsite visits with industry professionals in a variety of communication and media companies in and around Denver. It will consist of an orientation session, class sessions in the field, and an online component. Students will learn firsthand about the business and the day-to-day operations of these companies from the industry perspective. Students will have the chance to meet and interact with media/communications professionals. Presentations by industry professionals will focus on facets of their business and issues related to the local, national, and international marketplace.

  
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    CAS 4420 - On-Air Broadcasting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 3430 or CAS 3440, and CAS Broadcasting major, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to provide three semester hours of academic credit for students who successfully work regularly on MSU Denver Office of Student Media radio and television productions as reporters, editors, photographers, anchors and crew during a school semester. Students will work collaboratively with either an Anchor/Host/Reporter or the Crew/Technical Staff in the Student Media offices and Media Center.

  
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    CAS 4430 - Electronic Media Management



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course examines management tasks and functions as they exist in a variety of electronic media. The course focuses on relevant management theory, technical operations, economics, business functions and practices, programming, regulation, marketing, sales, and audience considerations specific to electronic media.

  
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    CAS 4440 - Advanced Television Production



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400, CAS 3410, and CAS 3440; or permission of instructor

    Description: This is an advanced course in digital production skills for both studio and the field projects. Specific focus is on digital, high-definition workflow and file-based capture and finishing. This course allows students independence and the opportunity for formative research, including team building, financing possibilities, target audience evaluation, and potential distribution venues.

  
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    CAS 4445 - Television Performance: News Anchoring and Weathercasting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400 and either CAS 3430 or CAS 3440; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the application of professional principles of on-air performance for students seeking careers as news anchors, reporters, and/or weathercasters. Topics include development of vocal performance techniques, delivery style and on-camera appearance, audience perceptions, and performance requirements specific to on-camera performers in roles as news anchors, reporters, and weathercasters.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CAS or MTR.

    Cross Listed Course(s): MTR 4445
  
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    CAS 4450 - Writing for Broadcast Journalism



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400 and CAS 3410; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to help students develop writing skills for a broad array of media.  Students will also study journalism ethics and the law as it applies to broadcast news.

  
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    CAS 4460 - Sports Discourse in Media and Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2400 or permission of in structor

    Description: Sports talk has moved off the playing field and into day-to-day discourse in interpersonal, organizational and public communication. This course explores metaphors, mythology, idioms and ideas that emerge from the world of sports and how they impact discourse about gender, community, politics, identity, education, ethnicity, parenting, and organizational life. The role of broadcast media is critically examined for its role in encouraging a cultural dialogue of sports metaphors.

  
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    CAS 4470 - TV Criticism: Production and Content



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 3440 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course analyzes contemporary television programming for aesthetics and effectiveness. All production elements and the content of programs are critiqued to create a more discerning audience and/or program creator.

  
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    CAS 4480 - Advanced Radio Production



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 3480 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students continue their studies at the university CAS Sound Hub facility and online station, WCAS Radio. Students are given responsibility for creating regularly-scheduled program "air shifts" and will create both all-live and recorded-live station programming blocks. Students enrolled in this course become the semester's staff-in-training at the WCAS Radio Broadcast Control Center. This is not an internship.

  
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    CAS 4700 - Communication and the Trainer



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1710 and CAS 2301; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to teach students how to translate their liberal arts background into on-the-job communication training programs using interpersonal and group dynamics skills. Actual demonstrations via video will be used, allowing students the opportunity to practice and evaluate their program design and training communication style in front of real audiences.

  
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    CAS 4750 - Communication Strategies for Effecting Change



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2160 or permission of instructor

    Description: In this course, students develop communication skills for personal and professional understandings and communicative enactments of organizational change in the 21st century. Having the ability to plan, engage, evaluate, and survive organizational change are necessary skills in today's quickly changing organizational environments. This course explores communicative processes from a systemic theoretical framework and how those changes at a personal level intersect with change at the organizational level in the form of organizational narratives and organizational strategic initiatives.

  
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    CAS 4755 - Consulting and Organizational Development



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 4700 and CAS 4750; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course content explores the processes and procedures required in interactive interventions that assist a person, group, or organization by mobilizing internal and external resources to address problem confrontations and change efforts.  Included are communication strategies for handling line and staff conflicts, organizational climate issues, the development of employee supervision, training programs, organizational restructuring, retooling leadership, and administrational functions needed to enhance organizational development and change.

  
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    CAS 4760 - Communication and the Elderly



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 1710 or CAS 2301

    Description: This course is designed to investigate the particular communication patterns and problems of the aged. It focuses on culturally communicated attitudes toward elderly persons via media, marketing, and institutions, as well as specific communication issues of the aged, such as the communication of intimacy, friendship, control, interaction in work environments, home life, retirement, and death.

  
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    CAS 4790 - Communication Theory Building and Research Methodology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CAS 2301 or CAS 3740; and CAS 2160 or CAS 4160; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to extend and apply their understanding of social science theory and communication theory specifically. Students will develop original theories in communication research from generation to verification.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Computer Engineering

  
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    CPE 1040 - Introduction to Engineering



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard score on math placement test

    Description: This course is an introductory engineering course exposing students to a cross section of topics in computer engineering discipline to assist them with their education career choices. Students are taught to work in teams, introduced to the design process, utilize math and computer programs to analyze raw data and properly display their results in a presentation to their peers. The history of the engineering profession and its relation to current national, social, industrial, ethical, and international issues and problems will be discussed.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 1140 - DC Circuit Fundamentals



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1410, or MTH 2410 (with a grade of"C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description:  This course covers DC circuit analysis, including mesh analysis, nodal analysis, Thevenin conversion, Norton conversion, power, magnetism and magnetic circuits, capacitance, and inductance. An introduction to electrical laboratory procedures and the measurement of basic circuit parameters is also included.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 1150 - AC Circuit Fundamentals



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 1140 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course is a continuation of CPE 1140. Studies include single time constant circuits, phasors, and the j operator, RLC circuits with sinusoidal, steady-state sources, impedance and admittance, AC formulation of classic network theorems, complex network equations, complex power, frequency response, transformers, and two-port network models.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 2145 - Solid State Electronics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 1150 or EET 1150, and CHE 1100 or CHE 1800 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Corequisite(s): CPE 2165

    Description: Students in this course will study the theory, modeling and application of semiconductor based electronic circuits. Devices studied include: diodes, bipolar junctions transistors, MOS field effect transistors, thyristors, voltage regulators and operational amplifiers. (Course created July 13, 2017)

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 2165 - Solid State Electronics Laboratory



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 1150 or EET 1150, and CHE 1100 or CHE 1800 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Corequisite(s): CPE 2145

    Description: The student will develop the laboratory skills necessary for integration of electronic devices in applications such as filtering, amplification, and voltage regulation. The student will integrate the lecture content of CPE2145 in the practical, hands-on laboratory exercises developed in this course.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 2310 - Digital Systems I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1400 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course covers the analysis and design of logic circuits using Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps and truth tables. It provides an introduction to the student to the basic concepts of computer architecture. In addition, it covers number systems, operation and codes. Combinational digital circuits are also studied. The students will use the basic logic gates, Flip-flop, memories, integrated circuit chips, etc., to design digital systems.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 2350 - C Programming for Engineer



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1400 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This is an advanced-level programming course using the C programming language. Methods for solving computer engineering problems using the C programming language are studied. The fundamental of UNIX Operation System and shell scripts are also introduced.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 3330 - Digital Systems II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2310 with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course is a continuation of CPE 2310. It covers the analysis and design of sequential (counters and shift registers) logic systems. Programmable Logic Devices (PLD) and associated Computer Aided Design (CAD) software are used to implement digital circuits by using the schematic design entry method. Johnson counter and Ring counter are studied. The general methods of analysis and design  for Finite State Machine (FSM) is also introduced.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 3400 - Signals and Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 1150, CPE 2310, and MTH 2410 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course provides an introduction to the student to the basic concepts of signals and system modeling. The students will develop and understand time-domain and frequency-domain analysis of both continuous and discrete systems and signals.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 3500 - Semiconductor Device Fundamentals



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2145, CPE 2165, CHE 1100 and CHE 1150 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course will provide the fundamental knowledge of semiconductor physics, materials, devices and fabrication technology. The students will learn semiconductor band theory, semiconductor materials and statistics, pn junction, bipolar transistor, heterojunction, Schottky junction and solar cells. The course will focus on the MOSFET designs for advanced Very Large Scale lntegrated Circuit (VLSI) technology from its physical structure, accurate modeling, manufacturability and applications by using computer simulation.

    Note: (Course created July 13, 2017)

  
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    CPE 3620 - A&D Communications



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2145, CPE 2165 and MTH 2410 (with a grade of "C" of better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course is an introduction to communication systems. Topics include: information theory, channel capacity, A/D and D/A techniques, modulation (AM, FM, and digital), noise sources, quantization, and transmission lines including Smith Charts.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 3715 - Control Systems Analysis



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2145 and CPE 3400 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course analyzes classical, linear, continuous-time control systems. Analysis and design will be done using Laplace transforms, Bode plots. Topics discussed include: stability, transient response, steady-state response, and the design of P, Pl, PD, and PID, Lag and Lead compensators. The laboratory section of the course uses the classical approach to the analysis and design of control systems.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4020 - Digital Circuits III - Hardware Description Language



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2350 and CPE 3330 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: Students in this course will learn a Hardware Description Language (HDL) which is used to design and simulate very large scale digital integrated circuits. Different modeling and design approaches will be covered as well as different simulation techniques.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4320 - Digital Filter Design



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2350 and CPE 3400 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course introduces digital filters as applied in digital signal processing and sampled data control systems. Complex algorithms will be introduced for the design of digital filters.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4330 - Data Communication



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2310 with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course covers methods of local and distant digital communications including: systems, standards, and hardware used for transmitting digital data either synchronously or asynchronously. In addition, limitations and problems will be discussed along with the solutions and areas that are being improved.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4370 - Embedded System Design I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 2350 and CPE 3330 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This class will explore the fundamentals of embedded system hardware and firmware design. The following issues will be discussed, such as embedded processor selection, hardware/firmware partitioning, number conversion, computer hardware structure, memory technology, logic circuits, development tools, firmware architecture, firmware design, and firmware debugging. An industry standard microcontroller will be studied, and its architecture and instruction set will be covered. The students will apply a microcontroller demo board for their designs. The programming will be implemented in Assembly and C languages.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4390 - Embedded System Design II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 4370 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course is a continuation of CPE 4370 and will cover embedded system design by interfacing with computers, peripherals, and other digital circuits. It provides the knowledge of designing microcontroller-based embedded computer systems by using assembly and C programs. In addition, the course will also examine the Real-time Operating Systems and their impact on performance. Computer engineering applications will also be emphasized.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4600 - VLSI Circuits and Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 3500 and CPE 4020 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This course will explore the fundamentals of Very Large Scale Integrated Circuit (VLSI) design. The following design specifications will be addressed, such as functionality, performance, reliability, manufacturability, testability, cost, design layout rules and checking, circuit extraction, simulation, and verification.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4620 - Advanced Communication Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 3620 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This is a senior research course which requires student analysis of VHF, UHF, microwave, spread spectrum, optical, video, and satellite systems. Analog and digital cellular and personal communications services, including AMPS, GSM, CDMA, wireless LAN microwave satellite communications systems will be examined.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4700 - Senior Design I



    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite(s): COM 2610, CPE 4370 and CS 2400 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites) and Senior standing

    Description: This is a Senior Experience, capstone course designed to teach engineering design skills to students through project based learning. The course will focus on team project incorporating the application of fundamental engineering knowledge and skills. Projects requires planning and design in consultation with faculty advisors and industry contacts. Through this course the students will learn the design process in a hands on way through conceptualization, construction, testing and presenting a deliverable project.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    CPE 4710 - Digital Control System Design



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 3715 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: Students in this course will learn the process and theory of the design of digital control systems, using classical and modern control theory. Analysis of differences between continuous and discrete control systems will be discussed. State variable feedback control and other optimal control theories will be covered.

    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

  
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    CPE 4800 - Senior Design II



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CPE 4390, CPE 4600 and CPE 4700 (with a grade of "C" or better for all prerequisites)

    Description: This is the second half of the Senior Experience for this major. In this course, the student completes the project started in CPE 4700. The project is built, tested and demonstrated. Written technical reports and oral presentations on the project are required. Part of this course involves the student working with a faculty member who acts as a consultant.



    Note: (Course created July 14, 2017)

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 1005 - Surviving and Thriving in the E-World



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course emphasizes using the Internet and online resources to collect, understand, evaluate, and validate information relating to basic computer literacy and emerging technologies. Using different search terms and search engines, students will find information that describes computer hardware, software, information systems, Web 2.0, and big data, among other information technology topics. They will prepare brief abstracts and ratings of information gathered. Additionally, students will learn to use Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to prepare reports and business documents. This course does not serve as a pre-requisite for CIS 2010.

  
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    CIS 1010 - Introduction to Computers



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course is designed for students who wish to use a microcomputer in their academic pursuits and their career. The student will learn how to use a personal computer with application software featuring word processing, spreadsheets, file management, graphics, electronic communications, and thesaurus/spelling checker. This course also reviews the historical, societal, ethical, and technological aspects of computers.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CIS or CSS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CSS 1010
  
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    CIS 1080 - The World Wide Web, the Internet, and Beyond



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course is for anyone who uses or wants to access the World Wide Web or use the Internet. Students will master a set of basic skills including using electronic mail, logging-in to remote computers, obtaining online documents and software, and using a browser like Netscape to search and explore the World Wide Web for information. Students will also learn the fundamentals of Web page construction.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CIS or CSS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CSS 1080
  
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    CIS 2010 - Foundations of Information Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy; and CIS/CSS 1010 with a grade of "C-" or better, or appropriate score on the Computer Information Systems computer literacy screening test.

    Description: This course is an introduction to information systems from a business perspective.  It introduces students to computer hardware and software, use of productivity tools and the Internet to solve business problems, and an introduction to fundamental and functional business information systems.

    Note: This course is primarily intended for students with majors in the College of Business. Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CIS or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 2011
  
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    CIS 2110 - Structured Problem Solving in Information Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2010

    Description: This is a problem-solving course in which the tools of structured design are used to design computerized solutions to business problems. Techniques of procedural programming languages are used to implement these designs. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of the three logic constructs in procedural languages: sequence, selection, and iteration. Students will be required to develop, test, and debug programs in one or more languages, using a variety of hardware and operating system platforms.

  
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    CIS 2300 - Business Statistics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1320

    Description: This is a course in the application of statistical inference and translation of quantitative data into information which can be used in business decision-making. This course will cover the topics of descriptive statistics, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distributions, point estimates, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses, in the context of management decision-making skills needed by industry.

  
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    CIS 3030 - Business Web Page Development



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: This is a course in business Web page development. Specifically, the student will learn how to plan the development of a Web site, compose Web site specifications, apply coding to the development of any kind of Web site, and find and use development resources. The student will use a leading code-centric text editor to aid in all course Web page development projects. The student will also be introduced to a leading graphical editing tool for supplemental use.

  
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    CIS 3050 - Fundamentals of Systems Analysis and Design



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: This course covers the basic concepts of an information system and systems analysis tools and techniques necessary to develop requirements for a business information system. Students will concentrate on systems analysis using current methodologies, technologies, and available tools of analysis, as well as an examination of the effect on systems analysis by business drivers such as globalization, security, privacy, ethics, and collaboration. The course will focus on the analysis phase including requirements definition, modeling, feasibility, project planning and management, and documentation.

  
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    CIS 3060 - Database Management Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: This course provides an introduction to the design, development, implementation, and manipulation of databases. Students will create information level database designs from a set of user requirements and implement those designs employing a 4GL database tool. Students will also be introduced to distributed database management, concurrency control, data warehousing, and data mining.

  
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    CIS 3145 - Business Application Development



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: This course uses the Java programming language for the development of object-oriented, event-driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) business applications. Students use Java as an iterative software development tool to create web and stand-alone solutions for business problems. Students also complete a final multi-window application project, which includes problem analysis, program design, solution development, and implementation plans.

  
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    CIS 3220 - Analysis of Hardware, Software, and User Interfaces for Microcomputer Platforms



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: The course develops a conceptual understanding of the underlying principles of computer systems hardware, operating systems software and associated use interfaces. These concepts are then applied to the problem of selecting and implementing microcomputer based systems to solve appropriate business problems.

  
  •  

    CIS 3230 - Telecommunication Systems and Networking



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110

    Description: This course provides a comprehensive coverage of telecommunications and networking.  Physical characteristics such as media and signaling are covered, as well as internetworking concepts and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).  The  material is discussed using the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) and TCP/IP models as a framework.

  
  •  

    CIS 3270 - Advanced Computer Applications for Business



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2010

    Description: This is a software solutions microcomputer course that teaches problem solving at the business operational level using advanced applications of word processing, presentation graphics, electronic spreadsheets, and database management. Hands-on practice with the advanced Microsoft application suite and computer-based examinations are included.

  
  •  

    CIS 3280 - LAN and WAN Systems for Business



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3230

    Description: This course presents the technology, architecture, and interconnection of Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks. The advantages and disadvantages of each technology will be discussed so that well-informed decisions can be made regarding the design of communication networks.

  
  •  

    CIS 3290 - Operating Systems for End Users



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2010 and CIS 2110

    Description: This is an end-user-oriented microcomputer operating systems course which teaches advanced concepts of the most popular operating systems, both networked and stand-alone. The course includes instruction in theory plus hands-on experience with each operating system.

  
  •  

    CIS 3300 - Business Analytics I (Descriptive and Predictive)



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1009; ENG 1020 or ENG 1021; completion of General Studies requirements in Oral Communication; C- or better in MTH 1320 or MTH 1410; CIS 2010 or CIS 2300; and at least junior standing.

    Description: This business analytics course introduces the student to descriptive analytics and predictive analytics. Techniques include the applications of statistical inference and the translation of quantitative data into information that can be used in business decision making. This course covers the topics of frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions, point estimation, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square analysis, regression analysis, model building, and forecasting. A specific statistical package is required.

  
  •  

    CIS 3310 - Business Forecasting Methods



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3300 and Junior Standing

    Description: This course introduces the student to both quantitative and qualitative forecasting techniques used in the public and private sectors. Software packages are used to perform the calculations for the quantitative forecasting techniques. Much emphasis is placed on real-world case problems.

  
  •  

    CIS 3320 - Business Analytics II (Prescriptive)



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1009; ENG 1020 or ENG 1021; completion of General Studies requirements in Oral Communication; "C-" or better in MTH 1320 or MTH 1410; CIS 3300; and at least junior standing.

    Description: This business analytics course introduces the student to prescriptive analytics that can be used in the business decision-making environment. The management science techniques presented and studied include linear programming, project scheduling, inventory models, decision analysis, queuing theory, and simulation, in the context of managerial decision-making skills. Emphasis is placed on the use of software to solve real-world problems.

  
  •  

    CIS 3340 - Advanced Business Statistics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2300

    Description: This course is a study of advanced statistical methods and techniques and their application in business decision-making situations. This course will cover the following topics: inferences about population variances, tests of goodness of fit and independence, analysis of variance, experimental design, simple linear regression, multiple regression analysis, regression model building, forecasting, and nonparametric methods.

  
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    CIS 3350 - Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3300 and at least junior standing

    Description: This course provides students with a theoretical and practical understanding of data mining concepts and techniques; and hands-on experience in applying these techniques to practical real-word business problems using commercial data mining software. As an applied course, the emphasis is on application and interpretation of various data-mining methods using business cases and data rather than on mastering the theoretical underpinnings of the techniques.

  
  •  

    CIS 3460 - Data Warehousing and Mining



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3300 and CIS 3060 or ACC 3300

    Description: This course covers the concepts of data warehousing and data mining, and how they are used to convert data into strategic business information. It discusses the design, architecture, planning, and project management of a data warehouse. Data mining techniques (classification, association, genetic algorithms, machine learning, etc.) are discussed as a way to discover useful relationships among data.

  
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    CIS 3490 - Managing Business Information with Enterprise Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2010

    Description: Students gain an understanding of the theoretical and practical issues of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems used within organizations.  The course demonstrates how ERP systems integrate information and organizational processes across functional areas with a unified database, best practices and shared operating tools.  Students will configure a running ERP system (e.g. SAP), execute transactions and produce reports for supporting common business processes and business information management.  Students will be able to evaluate how ERP systems enable firms to operate their business processes effectively and efficiently.  Students also learn to model, assess and improve processes through practical work and by analyzing case studies.

  
  •  

    CIS 3500 - Information Systems Security



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3230

    Description: This course covers a broad range of topics in security for networked and internetworked computer systems. It examines security and integrity objectives in terms of high-level policy and presents security services used to address those requirements. Network security architectures are analyzed to insure that critical security functions are protected from unauthorized access and modification. Access control in networked systems is examined.

  
  •  

    CIS 3980 - Internship in Computer Information Systems



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): Major in computer information systems (with 15 credit hours of CIS coursework completed toward the major); junior or senior status; permission of instructor

    Description: Supervised by a faculty member within the major department, internships provide practical, hands-on experience in a professional field related to the major. Internship placements must be established prior to enrollment in this course in consultation with the Applied Learning Center.

    To register with the Applied Learning Center, students must meet the following qualifications:

    • Completed at least one semester at MSU Denver
    • Sophomore, junior or senior status
    • Declared major in an undergraduate program
    • 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA at MSU Denver
    • Currently enrolled and taking classes at MSU Denver

    For information and instructions on finding and enrolling in an internship, contact the Applied Learning Center at 303-556-3290 or internships@msudenver.edu.

    Note: Variable Credit

  
  •  

    CIS 4030 - Web Site Administration



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3030

    Description: This course presents the fundamentals of organizing and administering a business Web site with multiple clients. Students will learn how to design effective, business-oriented Web pages. They will be able to give advice to the users, describe how to put Web pages on a server, how to organize the published information, how to plan a business Web site, specify the hardware, choose the daemon, and install and configure a server. In addition, the course will cover the security issues of the internet access, the different protection techniques, how to maintain a site, content and interpretation of the log files, and tools and techniques required to run an effective business site.

  
  •  

    CIS 4050 - Systems Analysis and Design



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3050, CIS 3060, CIS 3145, CIS 3230, and Senior standing

    Description: This course focuses on the development of business systems. The emphasis of this course is on the design and prototyping phases of systems development using as a basis the concepts of problem solving, requirements specification, analysis, and programming from the prerequisite courses. Current methodologies and technologies will be evaluated and implemented in the development process. Information systems problems will be analyzed and alternative solutions will be proposed using design models, a solution will be selected, and a prototype will be constructed for that solution. Students will evaluate the system using tests they developed and then propose a plan for implementation, maintenance, and training for the system.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
  •  

    CIS 4060 - Advanced Database Management Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3060 and CIS 3145

    Description: This course provides an in-depth understanding of database management systems by extending the database concepts and programming skills developed in prerequisite courses. The student will be presented with a variety of realistic business problems and be asked to produce functional solutions to these problems. The course will use the Oracle Developer 2000 or similar software to drive the design and development of business application software.

  
  •  

    CIS 4160 - Advanced Programming Seminar



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3060 and CIS 3145

    Description: This course addresses advanced language techniques and their application to Information Systems problems. It discusses the appropriateness of certain languages and programming techniques.

  
  •  

    CIS 4260 - Database Administration



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3060

    Description: This course covers the functions and responsibilities of the Database Administrator (DBA) in an organization with an integrated, shared Relational Database Management System (RDBMS). The course will focus on the technical requirements of the DBA including enrolling new users, creating the database, backup and recovery of data, security measures, implementing data integrity, and tuning the database.

  
  •  

    CIS 4280 - Network Installation and Administration



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3230

    Description: This course presents the knowledge and skills necessary to install the network operating system and to perform competently in the role of a network administrator.

  
  •  

    CIS 4281 - Network Installation and Administration with UNIX/Linux



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3230

    Description: This course presents information and skills necessary to begin to perform competently in the role of a network/systems administrator in a Linux/UNIX environment including installation, configuration, and management of the operating system.

  
  •  

    CIS 4370 - Data Science and Big Data Analytics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3300, CIS 3460, and at least junior standing

    Description: This course will cover the concepts of big data and data analytics used to solve business problems. Project management of data analytic activities will be introduced as part of the data analytic life cycle. The analytic life cycle starts with data discovery and preparation, which leads to the analytical methods of categorization, regression, and classification. Finally the results of the analytical steps are operationalized in order to benefit an organization.

  
  •  

    CIS 4410 - Management Information Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 2110 and MGT 3000

    Description: This course provides an overview of management information systems, managerial decision making practices and styles, and requisite information needs. International information concepts, the influence of national cultures on decision making, information use, and on various system design approaches are examined. The course addresses the practical aspects of the development of management information systems and decision-support systems.

  
  •  

    CIS 4500 - Information Systems Security Tools and Techniques



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3500 and junior or senior standing

    Description: This course covers tools and techniques that allow system administrators to protect organizational resources in a networked environment. It looks at design considerations, organizational policies, and industry best practices in all areas of security, reviews countermeasures to mitigate weaknesses, and introduces tools that can monitor, analyze, and visualize network activities for potential threats.

  
  •  

    CIS 4550 - Information Systems Security Management and Information Assurance



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 3500

    Description: This course covers the broad fields of enterprise security and privacy, concentrating on the nature of enterprise security requirements by identifying threats to enterprise information technology (IT) systems, access control, and system and product evaluation criteria. Risk management and policy considerations are examined with respect to the complex nature of enterprise security as represented by government guidance and regulations to support information confidentiality, integrity and availability. The course develops the student's ability to assess enterprise security risks and to formulate recommendations in the areas of data and application protection, access control, policies, and regulation compliance and governance.

  
  •  

    CIS 4920 - Health Care Information Systems Internship



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of upper-division courses from CIS or HCM courses listed in the HCIS Major curriculum, all with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate and operationalize previously learned health care management and computer information systems knowledge and skills in a field experience specific to the health care information systems discipline. The internship provides an opportunity for students to learn firsthand about working with others in a professional setting. Students complete projects using or working with health care information system applications in a health-related organization.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CIS or HCM.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

    Cross Listed Course(s): HCM 4920

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CS 1030 - Living in a Computing World



    Credits: 4

    Description: This course provides fundamentals needed to effectively cope with, understand, and be successful in a world with pervasive computing. The coursework explores impacts of computing (from social, ethical, economic, technical, legal, philosophical, and cognitive perspectives) and the related aspects of creativity, innovation, problem solving, critical thinking, collaborative teamwork, and multi-modal communication. Students participate in active-learning experiences and create materials using iterative processes similar to those used by artists, musicians, and engineers.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CS or HON

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 1030
  
  •  

    CS 1050 - Computer Science 1



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 1030 with a grade of "C" or better, or readiness for MTH 1110

    Description: This is the first course in the computer science core sequence. Students learn a modern programming language and the basic skills needed to analyze problems and construct programs for their solutions. The emphasis of the course is on the techniques of algorithm development, correctness, and programming style. Students are also introduced to the fundamentals of software engineering and the software-development life cycle.

  
  •  

    CS 1400 - Computer Organization 1



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): An intermediate algebra course or one and one-half years of secondary school algebra or equivalent and appropriate score on the mathematics pre-assessment placement test or higher-level math course with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: In this course, students will study the internal organization, characteristics, performance and interactions of a computer system's functional components. Binary codes and binary arithmetic, digital logic, central processor organization, instruction set architecture, input/output fundamentals, and memory architecture are covered.

  
  •  

    CS 2050 - Computer Science 2



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 1050 and MTH 1110 (or equivalent) with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course, a continuation of CS 1050, further emphasizes the concepts of the software development cycle and introduces the concept of an abstract data type (ADT). The topics covered include linked-lists, trees, stacks, queues, classes, recursion, and a variety of data representation methods. Further topics in software engineering and programming style as well as algorithms for sorting and searching are included.

  
  •  

    CS 2400 - Computer Organization 2



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 1050, CS 1400, and MTH 1110 (or equivalent), each with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: The course presents the functional organization of computers, multicore and multithreaded processors, high-performance storage, multiprocessor and multicomputer parallel architectures, and error detecting/correcting codes. Students learn assembly language programming and create software using a contemporary development environment.

  
  •  

    CS 3013 - Software Development for Mobile Devices



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: Mobile-device programming must address issues related to the characteristics of each device. The mobile device might have a small screen; limited memory; no hard drive; multiple radios; effectors such as vibrator, sound, and light; use a multi-touch interface; and incorporate hardware sensors, such as GPS, accelerometer, gyroscope, compass, and camera. In this course, students investigate issues involving mobile platforms and develop software for mobile platforms using multiple programming technologies.

  
  •  

    CS 3140 - Human-Computer Interaction



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 with grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores and develops knowledge that enables computer scientists to improve human-computer interaction through the exploitation of cognitive science theories about how people interact with their environments. Topics include: how people interact with each other and with computers; insights provided by models of cognition, memory, perception, attention, and thought; defining, specifying and assessing usability; and the roles of computer interface elements and behaviors. Students will examine theories and use interactive computer systems as the vehicles for the study of human-computer interaction and design for usability. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of existing interfaces and will experiment with authoring their own.

  
  •  

    CS 3210 - Principles of Programming Languages



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050, CS 2400, CS 3250, and MTH 3170, all with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course traces the evolution of programming languages and identifies and analyzes the contributions made by several significant languages and their successors. Specific issues of programming language implementation such as creation of activation records for block structured languages and static and dynamic scoping as methods for defining program object visibility are studied in depth. All four of the modern programming language paradigms (procedural, functional, object-oriented, and logical) are studied.

  
  •  

    CS 3240 - Introduction to the Theory of Computation



    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 and MTH 3170 with grades of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores language theory and computability. Language theory includes: regular expressions, regular languages, and finite automata (deterministic and nondeterministic); context-free languages and pushdown automata; and language grammars. Computability includes: Tuning machines and their computing power; unsolvable problems; and intractable problems (NP-Completeness).

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: CS or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3240
  
  •  

    CS 3250 - Software Development Methods and Tools



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050, ENG 1020, and CAS 1010 with a grade of "C" or better.

    Description: This course introduces the basics of large-scale software development. As software size increases, so does the need to use appropriate tools and development techniques. The phases of traditional software development and several current software development lifecycles are introduced. The use of object-oriented techniques for large projects is covered. Creating appropriate and sufficient tests for test-driven and behavior-driven development is discussed. Students learn how to analyze their programs to detect errors and increase performance.  The various types of automation used in creating a product are introduced.  Students learn about group dynamics and work on a significant project in groups.

  
  •  

    CS 3280 - Object-Oriented Software Development



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This is an upper-division software development class that focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm. Object-oriented analysis, design, and development will be explored in some depth with emphasis on object definition, abstraction, polymorphism, encapsulation, and inheritance. Abstract class definitions are developed for a number of common objects and data structures and derivative classes and subclasses are developed from these definitions. Students will develop a thorough understanding of an object-oriented programming language such as C++ or Smalltalk.

  
  •  

    CS 3400 - Computer Architecture



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 and CS 2400 with grades of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: Computer architecture concepts are extended to include advanced architectural concepts based on the quantitative analysis and evaluation of modern computing systems. These include advanced instruction set architecture designs, multilevel and set associative caches, advanced pipelining, out-of-order processors including superscalar and VLIW techniques, microprogramming concepts, multiprocessing architectures, advanced memory organizations, input/output, and network-oriented interconnections.

  
  •  

    CS 3410 - Embedded Systems



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 and CS 2400 each with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor. (CS 3600 is
    recommended.)

    Description: This course presents the basics of embedded systems design, including computer architecture, custom designed digital devices, and software development principles. Design principles of hardware architecture are based on performance analysis and modeling of the embedded system structure. Students learn the organization of the processors, memory hierarchy, input/output peripherals and the interface with sensors and actuators. Software development is oriented to case studies from selected embedded application domains.

  
  •  

    CS 3510 - Computer Graphics



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 with a grade of "C" or better, MTH 1410, and either MTH 2140 or MTH 3140, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is an introduction to computer graphics. It covers the mathematical background, algorithmic concepts, and software tools required to model a 3D scene with polygon meshes and interpolating surfaces, with lighting and materials and texture mapping, and then to render that scene at interactive speeds, using an appropriate graphics library, such as OpenGL, with shader programming.

  
  •  

    CS 3600 - Operating Systems



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050, CS 2400, and CS 3250, all with grades of "C" or better; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides an introduction to modern computer operating systems, their use, design, development, and implementation. Topics covered include: operating system modes, structuring methods, process and thread scheduling and dispatch, concurrency, inter-process communication, memory management, file system organization (in both stand-alone and networked environments), and system security.  Students are required to write programs that implement some operating system functions.

  
  •  

    CS 3700 - Computer Networks



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 1400 and CS 2050 with grades of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides a comprehensive study of computer networks, from the physical aspects to the high-level application protocols with which most people interact. The software that provides the communication is emphasized. The methods for creating connections, making sure they are error-free and in order, performing routing, and creating client/server interactions are discussed.

  
  •  

    CS 3750 - Computer and Network Security



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 with a grade of "C" or better, and CS 2400 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will cover how computers are compromised, what one needs to do to build security into every program, how cryptography assists in securing data, how operating systems affect computer security, how networks are secured, and the social and ethical aspects of computer security.

  
  •  

    CS 3810 - Principles of Database Systems



    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CS 2050 and MTH 1410 with grades of "C" or better, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the principles and methodologies of database design, and techniques for database application development. The topics covered include relational algebra, SQL queries, normalization, entity-relationship model,
    SQL/Host-language interface, stored procedure, object-oriented databases, and semi-structured databases.

 

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