Sep 30, 2020  
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section of the Catalog includes course descriptions, listed alphabetically by discipline. The descriptions provide information on course numbers, titles, the level of instruction, credit, course sequence, content, and prerequisites as shown in the following example:

CHE 2100 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry
Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CHE 1100
Description: A study of the elements of organic and biological chemistry. This course satisfies requirements for nursing programs and other fields requiring a survey of organic and biological chemistry.

The first two to four letters, called the course subject code, represent the area of study or discipline, e.g., CHE represents chemistry. The course number follows the course subject code, e.g., 2100. The first digit in a four-digit course number designates the level of instruction. Only courses numbered 1000 or above will be included in credits toward a degree. Courses with numbers up to and including 1999 are primarily for freshmen, 2000 through 2999 primarily for sophomores, 3000 through 3999 primarily for juniors, and 4000 through 4999 primarily for seniors. In general, students should not take courses above the level of their class (based upon semester hours earned), but they may do so at one level above if they have the specified prerequisites. In special cases, students may be permitted to take courses more than one level above that designated for their class if they obtain the permission of their advisor and of the faculty member teaching the course and if they meet the prerequisite requirements. Course descriptions provide a summary of the content of the course. If a prerequisite must be met before a student can register for a course, this information is listed above the course description. Attributes, such as Multicultural, General Studies, or Guaranteed Transfer, are listed after the course description. A list of courses being offered in a given semester, instructors, class meeting times, and locations is described in the Class Schedule located on the Office of the Registrar's website, msudenver.edu/registrar/classschedules.

Types of Courses

  • Regular courses appear in this section of the University Catalog and are offered on a regular basis.
  • Independent study courses provide students the opportunity to pursue in-depth study of a topic of special interest. Independent study courses are specified as 498_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Independent study courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Special topics or omnibus courses are temporary courses that are not listed in the Catalog. They may be used to pilot-test a course, present a special topic, or provide a unique, experiential-learning opportunity. Omnibus courses use a specified range of course numbers: 190_, 290_, 390_, 490_ and include an alpha character in the course number. Omnibus courses are published in the Class Schedule.
  • Variable topics courses allow courses of varying titles under an overall theme or “umbrella” course. Variable topic courses include an alpha character in the course number and are published in the Class Schedule.
 

Accounting

  
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    ACC 1010 - Fundamentals of Accounting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or ENG 1009 and General Studies Requirements for Quantitative Literacy

    Description: This course introduces the basic concepts of financial, managerial and tax accounting needed to promote entrepreneurial efforts. The content focuses on accepted accounting methods and specific organizational skills required for business owners to record, analyze and present their financial information.

    Note: Students who have previously taken ACC 1010 - Accounting for Non Business Majors may not also receive credit for ACC 1010 - Fundamentals of Accounting.

  
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    ACC 2010 - Principles of Accounting I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1009 or ENG 1010; ENG 1020 or ENG 1021; and MTH 1310 or MTH 1110 or MTH 1400

    Description: This course introduces students to the role of accounting in society. The course focuses on financial accounting and reporting as tools to aid external decision making, financial analysis, and interpretation.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 2012
  
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    ACC 2020 - Principles of Accounting II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2010 with a grade of "C-" or better

    Description: This course introduces students to the role of managerial accounting information in business. The course focuses on cost controls, budgeting and preparing relevant financial information for decision making.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 2021
  
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    ACC 3090 - Income Tax I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1110 or 1310 or 1400; ACC 2010 and PSC 1010 with a grade of C or better; and junior standing or higher

    Description: This course is a study of federal income tax laws with an emphasis on personal income taxation, including such topics as gross income, gains and losses and deductions.

  
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    ACC 3100 - Income Tax II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2020 and ACC 3090 with a grade of C or better

    Description: This course is a continuation of ACC 3090 with a comparative focus on the taxation of organizational tax entities, including partnerships, corporations and S-corporations.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3102
  
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    ACC 3110 - Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3090 with a C or better

    Description: Students will have primary responsibility for operating a VITA site as a tax service. Students will prepare both federal and State of Colorado income tax returns. The focus will be on preparing returns for the elderly, disabled, foreign students and low income individuals. This course contains a service learning component. (Service Learning)

  
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    ACC 3200 - Governmental Accounting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3510 with a grade of C or better

    Description: This course is a study of generally accepted accounting principles and financial reporting used by state and local governmental units. This includes achieving an understanding of fund accounting and inclusion of budgets within the accounting systems. A study of accounting and financial reporting of colleges, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other not-for-profit institutions is included.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3204
  
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    ACC 3300 - Accounting Information Systems



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2010 and CIS 2010 with grades of C or better; at least junior standing

    Description: This course is a study of principles and current issues relating to the design, implementation, control and regulation of accounting information systems. Tools and technologies related to accounting systems and the place of accounting systems within the modern enterprise provide a focus for the course, which includes an introduction to accounting-related information technology (IT) audit issues.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3305
  
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    ACC 3400 - Cost Accounting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1110 or MTH 1310 or MTH 1400; ACC 2020 with a grade of C or better

    Description: This course includes coverage of cost behavior relationships, job order and process costing systems, overhead allocation methods, budgeting and budget variance analysis, cost-volume profit relationships, and cost prediction for supporting management decision-making in service, sales, and manufacturing organizations. Computer applications are an integral part of this course.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3401
  
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    ACC 3510 - Intermediate Accounting I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1110 or MTH 1310 or MTH 1400; ACC 2010 with a grade of C or better; and junior standing

    Description: This is the first course in Intermediate Accounting. The Intermediate Accounting courses are designed to teach the concepts and procedures underlying the measurement and reporting of financial information.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3511
  
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    ACC 3520 - Intermediate Accounting II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of "C" or better in ACC 3510

    Description: This course is a continuation of ACC 3510 and covers an in-depth study of basic accounting principles with an emphasis on stockholders' equity and special problems.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3520
  
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    ACC 3750 - International Accounting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3510 or FIN 3100 with a grade of C or better

    Description: This course is a study of the impact on financial reporting and managerial decision-making due to the similarities and differences in accounting standards throughout the world. This course examines the history and development of accounting standards and reviews current topics which affect the comparison of global financial reporting.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3750
  
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    ACC 3980 - Internship in Accounting



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): Major in accounting; junior or senior status; permission of instructor

    Description: Supervised by a faculty member within the major department, internships provide practical, hands-on experience in a professional field related to the major. Internship placements must be established prior to enrollment in this course in consultation with the Applied Learning Center.

    To register with the Applied Learning Center, students must meet the following qualifications:

    • Completed at least one semester at MSU Denver
    • Sophomore, junior or senior status
    • Declared major in an undergraduate program
    • 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA at MSU Denver
    • Currently enrolled and taking classes at MSU Denver

    For information and instructions on finding and enrolling in an internship, contact the Applied Learning Center at 303-556-3290 or internships@msudenver.edu.

    Note: Variable Credit

  
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    ACC 4200 - Auditing and Attestation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3510 with a grade of C or better

    Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ACC 3520

    Description: This course is an introduction to contemporary theory and practice of auditing and attestation. The course will acquaint the students with Generally Accepted Auditing and Attestation Standards (GAAS), professional ethics, internal control, objectives and procedures for audits and attestation, risk assessment, audit and attestation reports, legal liability, research methodology, and corporate governance. Concepts included are professionalism, independence, evidence, risk, control, and enhancement of reliability and relevance properties of attester's services.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4200
  
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    ACC 4440 - Accounting Ethics and Professionalism



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3510 and ACC 3090 with grades of "C" or better

    Description: This course examines professional ethics for accountants from both a philosophical and business perspective. Moral development, ethical reasoning, and ethical decision-making provide a framework for examining the importance of ethics in the accounting profession. Professional guidance on ethics in accounting will also be examined, including the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct, the Colorado Board of Accountancy Statutes, Rules, and Regulations, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the codes of conduct for other professional accounting organizations.

  
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    ACC 4510 - Advanced Accounting



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3520 with a C or better

    Description: This course includes coverage of reporting requirements for partnerships, SEC-regulated companies, not-for-profit organizations, and financially distressed entities, as well as information disclosure requirements for state and local governments, international harmonization of accounting standards, and the possible conversion to International Accounting Standards in the U.S.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ACC or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 4510
  
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    ACC 4700 - Internal Auditing



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3510 with a grade of "C" or better

    Description: This course introduces students to the internal audit profession and the internal audit process. Topics include the Institute of Internal Auditor's International Professional Practices Framework (IPPF), risk, corporate governance, internal control, audit methodologies, and conducting internal audit engagements. Students seeking Certified Public Accountant (CPA) licensure are required by the Colorado State Board of Accountancy to complete six semester hours of auditing coursework. Three hours may be satisfied through completion of this course. The remaining three semester hours must focus on Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS).


Advanced Manufacturing Sciences

  
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    AMS 1010 - Survey of Advanced Manufacturing and Workplace Preparation



    Credits: 3

    Description: The student will learn the "soft skills" required by industry, such as leadership, interactive communication, and collaboration/teamwork skills, utilizing team exercises and team activities. The course also provides an introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and an overview of the Advanced Manufacturing Sciences (AMS) degree concentration's fit and associated employment potential with Advanced Manufacturing Industries.

  
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    AMS 3000 - Workplace Safety



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AMS 1010

    Description: The course is designed to prepare students to work safely in construction environments and allow the informed supervision of other workers in regard to workplace safety. Emphasis is placed on practical applications of safety theory and hazard specific content. The course also provides Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 30 training and Department of Labor (DOL) course completion certification for students taking the course.

  
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    AMS 3980 - Industry Internship



    Credits: 9-12

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing and all CPM core courses completed with at least a "C-."

    Description:   Students will have an opportunity to gain work experience under the guidance of an industry professional. Students must complete a minimum of 50 clock hours per credit hour during the semester in a placement relevant to their selected CPM concentration. All internship students will also be required to prepare weekly internship reports, participate in on-campus peer exchange meetings and complete a self-evaluation survey at the completion of the placement. Alternatively, students may use the portfolio process via the Center for Individualized Learning to substitute prior work experience for the internship.

  
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    AMS 4700 - Team Project Experience



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): All CPM core courses completed with at least a "C-."

    Description: Students will have an opportunity to gain team project work experience during collaborative projects with industry professionals.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience

  
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    AMS 4950 - Professional Internship



    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing and all AMS core courses completed with at least a "C"

    Description: Students will have an opportunity to gain work experience under the guidance of an industry professional. Students must complete a minimum of 50 clock hours per credit hour during the semester in a placement relevant to their selected AMS concentration. All internship students will also be required to prepare weekly internship reports, participate in on campus peer exchange meetings, complete a self-evaluation survey and a reflective paper at the completion of the placement.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Africana Studies

  
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    AAS 1010 - Introduction to Africana Studies



    Credits: 3

    Description: This interdisciplinary course in Africana Studies provides an overview of the evolution, scope and objectives of the field, and examines the history, literature, arts, material culture, as well as sociological, political, economic, and philosophical perspectives of the experiences of Blacks, particularly in the United States. The course places the experiences of African Americans within the broader context of the African Diaspora as it explores issues of identity and liberation movement. The course sheds light on the relationship between the past, present and future in shaping Black worldviews and their contributions to the human experience.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences I

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    AAS 1080 - Readings in Africana Studies



    Credits: 3

    Description: This self-paced course is based upon selected readings in books, magazines and newspapers on Africana Studies.

  
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    AAS 1130 - Survey of African History



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum performance standard scores on reading and writing pre-assessment placement tests

    Description: This course surveys the major developments on the African continent from ancient times to the modern period. It focuses on political, social, economic, legal, historical, and cultural developments in African civilizations from ancient Egypt to the present.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or HIS.

    General Studies: Historical, Global Diversity

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-HI1

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 1940
  
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    AAS 2000 - Social Movements and the Black Experience



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010, SOC 1010, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course analyzes and interprets the nature, cause, and consequence of Black social movements in the United States, ranging from the slave period to the present. Particular attention is given to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or SOC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 2000
  
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    AAS 2010 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods in Social Issues



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): WMS 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of methods, analyses and critiques used by scholars to study social issues within and across a range of disciplines (e.g., history, arts, humanities, sciences, education, health, economics, law and social/behavioral sciences). Research designs and general statistical interpretation will be reviewed for each methodology. Techniques for laboratory and field research, conducting qualitative and quantitative studies, and writing research reports will also be included.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: WMS or AAS or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 2030, WMS 2010
  
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    AAS 2100 - Women of Color



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010, CHS 1000, or WMS 1001; or permission of instructor

    Description: Though U.S. women share much in common, their differences are salient to a thorough understanding of all these women's experiences. Comparative analysis of women's race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation are central to this course. The similarities among diverse groups of women are also examined in order to better understand the complexity of women's lives. The course addresses issues of work, health, interpersonal violence, globalization, as well as resistance, activism, and social change across identities.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, CHS, or WMS.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 2100, WMS 2100
  
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    AAS 2200 - Politics and Black People



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies requirements in Quantitative Literacy, and either ENG 1010 or the General Studies requirement in Oral Communication

    Description: Black politics is examined as a vehicle and potential in decision making for positive change for Black people in this country. The realities and the challenges, both historical and current, are emphasized.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: PSC or AAS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSC 2200
  
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    AAS 2300 - African Peoples and Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course examines traditional cultures of African peoples and gives added understanding of culture and people in relation to human problems and experiences.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or ANT.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ANT 2350
  
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    AAS 3130 - Readings in African History



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1130 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides the opportunity for students to explore important writings in a selected subject area of African history. Students advance their knowledge of the materials and information related to the field of African history.

  
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    AAS 3220 - Prejudice and Discrimination in Contemporary Society



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1010 or WMS 1001, Completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy; or Permission of instructor.

    Description: This course examines the origins and characteristics of race, racism, gender biases and ethnic prejudices; the social, psychological, and cultural courses of discrimination and bias; and implications in current societal structures and institutions.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, SOC or WMS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3220, WMS 3220
  
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    AAS 3240 - African American Literature



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 2000 or ENG 2100 or AAS 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: Students read, analyze, and write about various forms of literature produced by African Americans with consideration of historical and social contexts. Course content includes oral tradition, slave narratives, Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts movement, and contemporary literature.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or ENG.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): ENG 3240
  
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    AAS 3250 - Black Women Writers



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or ENG 1020

    Description: The course studies selected works chosen as representative of the issues and concerns of Black women worldwide as voiced by Black women writers from Africa and the Diaspora.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, HON, or WMS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3250, WMS 3250
  
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    AAS 3300 - The Black Community



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or AAS/SOC 2000, or Permission of instructor, and Completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course relates fundamental concepts and theories of sociology and African American studies to the study of the Black community through an analysis of educational, political, religious, economic, and family dimensions. It emphasizes local, national, and international Black communities. Classic and contemporary black community studies are examined.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or SOC.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3140
  
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    AAS 3310 - African Art



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 and ENG 1020

    Description: This course examines the art of the continent of Africa and evaluates the ways it has been studied and displayed. It traces historical relationships between regions, from the shores of the Mediterranean and the Nile Valley, the west and Ivory Coast, to the central regions and east and south to the Swahili Coast and the Cape.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ARTH or AAS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3310
  
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    AAS 3330 - Egyptian Art



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 and ENG 1020

    Description: This course examines Egyptian art from the beginnings of civilization in Kemet (the Black Land), through Greek, Roman, and Byzantine colonial periods and continuing into the Islamic period.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or ARTH.

    Cross Listed Course(s): ARTH 3330
  
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    AAS 3400 - Contemporary Africa



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course focuses on the political, social, and economic highlights of post-independence Africa. Africa's relations with the outside world and the question of South Africa are also examined in this course.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or PSC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSC 3400
  
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    AAS 3440 - American Slavery



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor.

    Description: This class will explore the origins of slavery in the early modern Atlantic world and trace its history until the age of emancipation. Although the primary focus will be on African slavery in British North America and the United States, the course will integrate the Atlantic and imperial contexts and include comparative units on slavery in other empires, as well as enslavement of Native Americans. Students will analyze the political and economic consequences of slavery, and they will examine the slave cultures themselves, including religion, resistance, and family life.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or HIS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3440
  
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    AAS 3550 - The Black Family



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or SOC 1010, and completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy.

    Description: This course provides an in-depth exploration of the Black family as a social institution, emphasizing the historical roots of the Black family and how the African influence is enmeshed in the functioning of the family in modern society. It examines the factors responsible for the ability of the Black family to meet the challenge of a changing society.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or SOC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): SOC 3440
  
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    AAS 3570 - African American History I



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers the early history of African Americans in the United States, beginning with their ancestry in West and West-Central Africa and culminating with the Civil War. It analyzes their cultural, social, economic, and political transformation in the colonial and national history of the United States. Topics include the Atlantic Slave Trade, colonial identity, plantation slavery, slave communities, resistance, the Constitution and race, demographics of freedom, abolitionism, the Civil War and its aftermath.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS, HIS, or HON.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3570, HON 3570
  
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    AAS 3580 - African American History II



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the collective experience of African Americans in American history, thought, and culture from Reconstruction to the present. It addresses the process of freedom and citizenship through an examination of the major political, economic, and social themes ofthe 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the agency of African Americans in community-building, migration, protest, and patriotism.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or HIS.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3580
  
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    AAS 3610 - Caribbean History and Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1010 or equivalent with a grade of D or better, and any course with HIS prefix or that is crosslisted with HIS prefix, or permission of instructor

    Description: This course examines the evolution of Caribbean societies from the consolidation of slavery in the seventeenth century to the emergence of independent multi-ethnic nations in the twentieth century, and emphasizes the central role of the Caribbean in the Atlantic world.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or HIS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HIS 3711
  
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    AAS 3630 - The African Diaspora



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010

    Description: The course examines the aftermath of the Transatlantic Slave Trade's dispersal of Africans in the Americas, by exploring battles waged against enslavement, distinct cultural identities, and manifestations of returning to Africa.

  
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    AAS 3700 - Psychology of Group Prejudice



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1001 or AAS 1010 or CHS 1000 or WMS 1001

    Description: This course covers psychological theory and research that examines causes, effects, expressions, and reduction of group prejudice. Various types of group prejudice are addressed, most notably prejudice against cultural and ethnic minorities in the United States (i.e., Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans). Sexism and heterosexism also are discussed.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 3700, PSY 3700, WMS 3700
  
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    AAS 3910 - African Politics and Government



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1130, AAS 2300, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course surveys present-day political systems in Africa and examines internal and external factors that have contributed to their emergence.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or PSC.

    Cross Listed Course(s): PSC 3910
  
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    AAS 3920 - Hip-Hop Culture and Rap Music



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or ENG 1020

    Description: This course seeks to examine the long-standing cultural warfare that exists among core elements of Hip-Hop culture and the impact such challenges have on gender and social identities. Students will think critically about Hip-Hop music beyond the scope of entertainment through the examination of literature, films, and music that provide interdisciplinary discourse on Hip-Hop in our society.

  
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    AAS 3930 - African Authors



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010 or ENG 1020

    Description: African Authors examines the lives and classic works of writers born on the African continent. The literature of the authors selected for close study speaks to life in countries that traverse the continent, representing multiple perspectives that reflect pre-colonial to post-colonial realities. English language texts are utilized, as well as works translated from French, Arabic, and Kikuyu. The overall content of the course emphasizes the impact of colonialism on African nations and the continuation of the African oral tradition in literary works. Supplemental aspects of the course engage critical thought on the place of Egypt in the African world and the politics of language choice on an African text.

  
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    AAS 3980 - Internship in Africana Studies



    Credits: 1-15

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010

    Description: This internship places students in corporate, private non-profit, and/or community-based agencies that serve Black and African Diaspora communities. A written contract between the student, site supervisor, Applied Learning Center, and department chair is required. Internship activities may include developing skills in problem solving, program development, grant writing and group leadership.

    Note: Variable Credit

  
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    AAS 4010 - Education of African American Children



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010, EDU 3000, EDU 3200, EDU 3640, and EDU 3650

    Description: This course analyzes the historical and contemporary factors that influence the education of African American children in the United States.  Focus is on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required by educational institutions, educators, and parents to provide an effective and equitable education for African American children.  Practical application is integrated with theoretical research and conceptual information.  Students who successfully complete this course will receive introductory skills and experiences as effective practitioners, reflective decision makers, and resources for the community.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: AAS or EDU.

    Cross Listed Course(s): EDU 4010
  
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    AAS 4160 - Human Trafficking



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): WMS 1001, or AAS 1010, or CJC 1010, or HSP 1010, or PSY 1001, or SWK 1010; upper-division standing; or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores human trafficking on international and local levels.  A review of multidisciplinary perspectives on labor and sex trafficking provides comprehensive understanding of this human rights issue.  Students examine the tactics used by traffickers to recruit and control victims and the effects of abuse on victims. This course provides an overview of U.S. federal and local laws to curb trafficking, including federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act.  Finally, students evaluate global and local efforts of the current anti-trafficking movement, including ways to be involved.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix.

    Course Revised February 8, 2017


    Cross Listed Course(s): CJC 4160, HON 4160, HSP 4160, PSY 4160, SWK 4160, WMS 4160
  
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    AAS 4490 - Contemporary Issues in Africana Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AAS 1010

    Description: This course provides an in-depth study of selected issues that significantly impact Black people throughout the global African world.

    Note: Topics vary, and the course may be repeated for credit with the permission of the department chair.

  
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    AAS 4850 - Research Seminar in Africana Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Six credits of upper-division courses in AAS

    Description: This course provides a capstone opportunity for refining research skills and engaging in graduate school-style seminar sessions. The course is required to complete the AAS major.

    University Requirement(s): Senior Experience


Air Force ROTC

  
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    AFR 1010 - Foundations of the United States Airforce 1



    Credits: 1

    Description: Consisting of one 1-hour lecture and one 1 1/2-hour lab per week, this course deals with the Air Force in the contemporary world through a study of the total force structure, strategic offensive and defensive forces, general purpose forces, aerospace support forces, and the development of communicative skills.

  
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    AFR 1020 - Foundations of the United States Airforce 2



    Credits: 1

    Description: This continuation of AFR 1010 consists of a 1-hour lecture and one 1 1/2-hour lab per week.

  
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    AFR 2010 - The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 1



    Credits: 1

    Description: Consisting of one 1-hour lecture and one 1 1/2 hour lab per week, this course is a study of air power from balloons and dirigibles through the jet age; a historical review of air power employment in military and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives; a look at the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine; and an introduction to the development of communicative skills.

  
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    AFR 2020 - The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power 2



    Credits: 1

    Description: This continuation of AFR 2010 consists of one 1-hour lecture and one 1 1/2-hour lab per week.

  
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    AFR 3010 - Air Force Leadership Studies 1



    Credits: 3

    Description: Two 1-1/2-hour seminars plus one 1-1/2 hour lab per week, this is an integrated management course emphasizing concepts and skills required by the successful manager and leader. The curriculum includes individual motivational and behavioral processes, leadership, communication, and the group dynamics, providing the foundation for the development of the junior officer's professional skills (officership). Course material on the fundamentals of management emphasizes decision-making and the use of analytic aids in planning, organizing, and controlling in a changing environment. Organizational and personal values (ethics), management of change, organizational power, politics, managerial strategy, and tactics are discussed within the context of military organization. Actual Air Force case studies are used throughout the course to enhance the learning and communication process.

  
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    AFR 3020 - Air Force Leadership Studies 2



    Credits: 3

    Description: Consisting of two 1-1/2-hour seminars and 1-1/2-hour lab per week, this course is a continuation of AFR 3010. Basic managerial processes are emphasized, while group discussion, case studies and role playing as learning devices are employed. The emphasis on communicative skills development is continued.

  
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    AFR 4010 - National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society 1



    Credits: 3

    Description: Consisting of two 1 1/2-hour seminars and one 1 1/2-hour lab per week, this course is a study of U.S. National Security Policy which examines the formulation, organization, and implementation of national security policy; context of national security; evolution of strategy; management of conflict; and civil-military interaction. It also includes blocks of instruction on the military profession/officership, the military justice system, and communicative skills. This course is designed to provide future Air Force officers with the background of U.S. National Security Policy so they can effectively function in today's Air Force.

  
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    AFR 4020 - National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society 2



    Credits: 3

    Description: In two 1 1/2-hour seminars and one 1 1/2 hour lab per week, this course is a continuation of AFR 4010. Special themes include defense strategy and conflict management, formulation/ implementation of U.S. defense policy, and organizational factors and case studies in policy making, military law, uniform code of military justice, and communicative skills.


Anthropology

  
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    ANT 1010 - Physical Anthropology and Prehistory



    Credits: 3

    Description: The course focuses on human biology utilizing the biocultural approach, that is, the interaction between human biology and human culture. Topics include the study of non-human primates, human evolution, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, and modern human variation. The laboratory sections embedded within the course provide practical experience in the following areas: genetic analysis, identifying fossil hominins, human skeletal anatomy, examining differences between human and non-human primate anatomy, population genetics, and modern human variation.

    General Studies: Natural and Physical Sciences, Global Diversity

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SC1

  
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    ANT 1310 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course provides a comparative perspective on human cultural behavior and theory by exploring a variety of world cultures in the major domains of language, food-getting strategies, economics, marital and family systems, kinship, sex and gender, political organization and social control, social stratification, religion, and art. The applied aspects of anthropology are also investigated.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or HON.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 1311
  
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    ANT 2330 - Cross-Cultural Communication



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course explores anthropological approaches to cross-cultural communication. Emphasizing an applied approach, the course focuses on how language and language use vary from culture to culture, and how knowledge of these differences can lead to understanding of difference and dominance relations between groups within the United States, specifically African-American, Asian, Hispanic American, and Native American, and internationally. Topics include the relationship between language and culture, sociolinguistic variation, politeness, multilingualism, and language politics.

    General Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences II

    Guaranteed Transfer: GT-SS3

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    ANT 2350 - African Peoples and Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course examines traditional cultures of African peoples and gives added understanding of culture and people in relation to human problems and experiences.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or AAS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): AAS 2300
  
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    ANT 2360 - Living Culture and Language of the Mexican and Chicano



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CHS 1000 or CHS 1020

    Description: This course traces the fusion of cultures and dialects of the Spanish-speaking Southwest into elements that characterize Chicano intracultural and intercultural diversity.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or CHS.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 2000
  
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    ANT 2400 - Women's Folklore



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course provides an exploration of folklore in everyday life, including folk narrative and other verbal genres, as well as material forms and other manifestations of traditional expressive behavior, as it pertains to reinforcing and resisting gender identity and norms. This course focuses on the centrality and pervasiveness of creativity, developing a contextual approach to understanding aesthetic expression.

    Note: Credit will be granted for one prefix only: ANT or WMS.

    General Studies: Arts and Humanities

    Cross Listed Course(s): WMS 2400
  
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    ANT 2500 - Anthropology of Language



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Preassessment Placement Tests: Reading and Writing (minimum performance standard scores)

    Description: This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology. Topics include language and culture, language structure, the origins of language, linguistic diversity, and language ideologies.  The course also provides opportunities to observe and record speech and other communicative behaviors; identify the sequential organization of talk; and determine how language reflects and creates social identities, relationships, and realities.

  
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    ANT 2640 - Archaeology



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course will be an examination of how archaeologists discover and interpret the material remains of human behavior from the past.

  
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    ANT 2710 - Archaeological Field Research



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2640 or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course covers archaeological field investigations that may consist of surveying, mapping, testing of sites, and/or excavations. The course may be repeated for up to a maximum of six hours. No more than three credit hours may be applied toward a major or minor in anthropology.

  
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    ANT 3100 - Human Evolution



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course is an overview of the evolutionary history of our species, Homo sapiens, and our extinct ancestors, the hominins. Taking a largely chronological approach, students learn the anatomical features of each hominin species through lectures, readings, and hands-on analysis of hominin fossil casts. Students also learn aspects of hominin ecology and behavior, as inferred from their morphology and associated archaeological and faunal remains. Additional topics include an introduction to evolutionary theory, taxonomy and systematics, primate evolution, and human skeletal biology.

  
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    ANT 3110 - Human Variation



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: The varied forms and features of humanity can be grouped and understood in terms of their adaptive costs and benefits. Modern appreciation of human variation lies in the processes that have developed differing human populations. The course will search out the fundamental features of these processes and analyze them.

  
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    ANT 3120 - Mummies of the World



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course offers instruction in the field of physical anthropology in the particular subfield of bioarchaeology. The course examines the processes of mummification and the occurrence of mummies around the world. It identifies where in the world mummies have been found, how they have been studied, what environments are necessary for mummification, how intentional human interference affects the process and what these kinds of practices can reveal about the cultures involved.

  
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    ANT 3122 - The Neanderthal Enigma



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course offers instruction in the basic definition of physical anthropology. It offers instruction regarding human evolution and then intensely focuses on the evolution of Homo Neanderthalensis. It specifically addresses where remains have been found, the types of remains found, the physical characteristics of the species, and the cultural characteristics of this intriguing species. The course further addresses the controversies concerning this species including the nature of interaction with anatomically modern humans and the question of whether or not this hominin was capable of language.

  
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    ANT 3150 - Primate Studies



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: From the jungle to the zoo, non-human primates are fascinating. Through observation and recent contributions from the field and laboratory, the student will analyze the behavior and structure of living primates. Resulting interpretations will assist in understanding human behavior and human development.

  
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    ANT 3170 - Primate Adaptation and Evolution



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course addresses adaptation in the Order Primates. It includes a discussion of the primary forces of evolution and a detailed examination of how one of these forces, natural selection, has shaped the anatomy of living and fossil primate species. Students assess the diagnostic anatomical features of living and fossil primate groups and learn how to use these features to predict diet, locomotion, and social structure. Students also examine the evolutionary relationships of living primates and assess how fossil primates contribute to our understanding of these relationships.

  
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    ANT 3251 - Ethnographic Field Methods



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will cover key aspects of ethnographic research proposal development, design, and literature review. Class discussion, lecture and readings will focus on ethnographic method and research design to obtain in-depth information on human behavior and beliefs in their natural settings. Students will submit a final research proposal to the Institutional Review Board for approval.

    Note: Students cannot earn credit for both ANT 3250 and ANT 3251.

  
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    ANT 3300 - Exploring World Cultures: Variable Topics



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or Permission of instructor

    Description: The focus of study will be an exploration of selected non-Western cultures. Using films and various ethnographic procedures, the student learns how culture-and by extension, human culture-is a living thing shaped by the people who carry it.

    Note: The course may be repeated under different topics.

  
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    ANT 3310 - Ethnography of North American Indians



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course studies the nature and consequences of distinctive Indian cultures that occupied North America at the time of European contact. Includes a close analysis of the many different aspects of social organization and environment that contribute to the unique cultures we call American Indian.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    ANT 3320 - Anthropology of Japan



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Japanese culture and society, with attention to historical, ethnographic and media interpretations. Major themes include historical background of contemporary Japanese society, language and communication, changing social patterns and institutions, demographic transition, popular culture, citizens' movements, and globalization.

  
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    ANT 3330 - Japan: Culture, Communication, and Identity



    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor

    Description: This study abroad course explores Japanese culture, communication, and identity through lecture, experiential learning, and ethnographic fieldwork in Japan. Pre-departure instruction focuses on geography, history, social organization, political-economy, patterns of social interaction, and ethnographic field methods. Week-long stays in distinct regions of Japan enable students to observe and experience how social-political, regional, and linguistic differences shape majority and minority identities, despite the belief that Japan is culturally homogenous.

  
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    ANT 3340 - Native Americans in Historical Perspective



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a survey of the response of Native American societies to the overrunning social, economic, and political structures of Euro-America. Broad areas of cultural change are covered, and the fundamental issues of land, economic development, and cultural integrity are looked at.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

  
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    ANT 3350 - Vanishing Cultures and Peoples



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or Permission of instructor

    Description: Industrial civilization is now completing its destruction of technologically simple tribal cultures. Intense contextual and comparative analysis of the cultures undergoing drastic modification enhances awareness of the fundamental right of different lifestyles to coexist and develop analytical skills to help understand cultural changes.

  
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    ANT 3370 - South American Peoples and Cultures



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or CHS 1000; or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course presents an ethnographic focus on the native peoples of South America. Students will analyze the daily cultural life of selected Indian peoples beginning at the point of contact in the 16th century, and the Spanish Colonial peoples of this time, to the present. Custom and tradition are studies in depth among Amazonian and Caribbean foragers, tribal groups of Patagonia, chiefdoms of the Andes inter-montane valleys, and the state-level civilizations of the high Andes. The cultural focus is in the context of the conquests of the European powers that struggled for domination of this highly diverse region.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 3870
  
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    ANT 3380 - Exploring Folklore



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or CHS 1000; or Permission of the instructor

    Description: This course will help the student to analyze the various elements of folklore from verbal to non-verbal classifications, survivals, revivals, and the implications for modern society. Folklore will be studies in a historical and contemporary context. The student will gain an understanding of both the universality and variability of folklore through many global examples compared and contrasted with a regional focus on the folklore of the American Southwest.

    Cross Listed Course(s): CHS 3880
  
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    ANT 3391 - History of Anthropological Theory



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or permission of instructor

    Description: Cultural norms have an enormous influence over the kinds of behavior found in any society. Using various contemporary anthropological perspectives and theoretical orientations over the past one hundred years, this course provides the background to understand the nature of humanity in all its diversity and complexity and to mitigate cross-cultural differences.

    Note: Students cannot earn credit for both ANT 3390 and ANT 3391.

  
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    ANT 3460 - Social Organization and Evolution



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is an intensive look at forms of social organization, with a focus on kinship, arranged in evolutionary sequence from the hunting-and-gathering band to the complex social networks of a complex society.

  
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    ANT 3480 - Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of General Studies requirements in Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Literacy, and permission of instructor.

    Description: This course prepares students to understand the many different viewpoints and concepts related to health and illness in other cultures and emphasizes the need and means to provide culturally appropriate health care.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or HON.

    University Requirement(s): Multicultural

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3480
  
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    ANT 3490 - Globalization and Culture



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1310 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course explores anthropological approaches to globalization, with an emphasis on understanding transnational movements of capital, commodities, persons and ideas through the analysis of ethnographic case studies. Students examine the impact of globalization on how anthropologists theorize culture and conduct ethnographic fieldwork.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix: ANT or HON.

    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3492
  
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    ANT 3510 - Ethnography of Communication: Qualitative Methods in Linguistic Anthropology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2500 or permission of instructor

    Description: This introduction to qualitative research methods in linguistic anthropology emphasizes ethnographic fieldwork and the analysis of face-to-face communication. The course covers research design, links between methods and theory, the use of technology in the field, research ethics, and analysis of textual data.

  
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    ANT 3540 - Women in the Developing World



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): WMS 1001 or PSC 1020 or ANT 1310

    Description: This course presents a cross-cultural study of women's lives in the developing world by examining two main issues: the influence of culture on women's issues and politics' impact on women. By the end of this course students will not only learn about the lives of women in the developing world but also become familiar with how women across the globe articulate the desire for equality.

    Note: Credit will be granted for only one prefix

    Course Revised February 8, 2017


    Cross Listed Course(s): HON 3540, PSC 3540, WMS 3540
  
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    ANT 3600 - World Prehistory



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 1020

    Description: This course provides an overview of the prehistoric record of humans from the emergence of Homo Sapiens until the advent of urban life and written records.  The data for this survey include archaeology and the human fossil record, and span the geographic regions of Asia, Africa, India, Europe, Australia, and the Americas.

  
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    ANT 3610 - Archaeology of North America



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course is a prehistory of North America emphasizing the peopling of the New World, earliest Indian cultures, and later regional developments.

  
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    ANT 3620 - South American Archaeology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: This course focuses on the origins and developments of prehistoric South American cultures. Starting with the first people to arrive in South America and culminating in the conquest of the Incas by the Spanish, coverage ranges from the Andean highlands to the tropical jungles of the Amazon.

  
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    ANT 3630 - Archaeology of Ancient Egypt



    Credits: 3

    Description: This course examines the archaeology of ancient Egypt in order to investigate the different ways we know about the world and ourselves, and the ways in which we deceive ourselves about what we think we know. It addresses a set of timeless social science issues as experienced by ancient Egyptians. Topics include the many classic Egyptian discoveries, as well as the latest archaeological research from sites like the Great Pyramids and Valley of the Kings. Egypt represents an important cradle of civilization and plays an important role in our understanding of the human past and the present.

  
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    ANT 3660 - Ancient American Civilizations



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: The course will concentrate on the study of the emergence, culmination, and fall of Central and South American civilizations. The cultural situation of precivilization America will be presented at the beginning of the course. Throughout, the contributions of American civilizations to our culture will be stressed.

  
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    ANT 3680 - Practical Archaeology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2640 or equivalent, or Permission of instructor

    Description: A course emphasizing the practical application of selected archaeological methods and techniques consisting of lectures and demonstrations. The students will have an opportunity to get acquainted with various field and laboratory equipment and work with archaeological material. Active class participation is expected. The application of computers in archaeological work will also be discussed.

  
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    ANT 3790 - Human Osteology in Anthropological Perspective



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course will instruct students in human osteology from an anthropological perspective. Instruction will cover bone as a living tissue and how it grows and develops, as well as the manner in which it responds to stress. Students will receive instruction in the identifying features of each bone, including major muscle attachment sites, and they will be instructed on how to create a biological profile from skeletal remains, including estimation of age at death, estimation of sex, and estimation of ancestry. They will also be instructed in the identification of specific bones, the side from which they came, and the sex and age where appropriate for fragmented remains. Students will have the opportunity to work with human bone casts and human bones, including bone fragments, which form part of the MSU Denver Anthropology program collection.

  
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    ANT 3800 - Forensic Anthropology



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 1010 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course offers instruction in the foundational concepts, theories, and methodologies used in the field of forensic anthropology.  Students are instructed in human osteology, human skeletal analysis, statistical analysis, evidence analysis, crime scene location, recovery and analysis, chain of evidence preservation, and trial preparation and testimony.  This course is a prerequisite to ANT 3810, the Forensic Anthropology Field and Laboratory course.

  
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    ANT 3810 - Forensic Anthropology Field and Laboratory Experience



    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3800 or permission of instructor

    Description: This course offers instruction and practical experience in the field of forensic anthropology.  Students have the opportunity to practice their skills in both the field (outdoor laboratory) and classroom laboratory settings.  The outdoor laboratory experience will consist of five full-day Friday sessions where students will have the opportunity to excavate, recover, and analyze evidence from a mock crime scene.

 

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