Sep 27, 2020  
2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Health Professions


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The Health Professions Department offers the following programs:

The purposes of the programs in the Health Professions Department are to stimulate the personal and professional development of health care and recreation workers, to stimulate awareness of health care trends and issues, and to prepare health care professionals to cope with the future problems of health care delivery in a rapidly changing society.

The Health Professions Department offers four majors: a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Care Management, a Bachelor of Science degree in Integrative Therapeutic Practices, a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Nutrition - Dietetics, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Recreation Professions with either a Recreation Management or Therapeutic Recreation concentration. The department also offers minors in Health Care Management, Integrative Therapeutic Practices, Recreation, and Nutrition, and coordinates the interdisciplinary minor, Gerontology. Health education services courses are offered for non-health majors and health majors.

Students desiring to enter programs in the Health Professions Department should seek academic advising from a faculty member in the department prior to registration for classes. Students are responsible for keeping themselves informed of the latest program changes. Current program materials are available in the Health Professions Department.

Health Care Management

The College's undergraduate degree program in health care management prepares students for direct entry into management within the health care field. By combining courses in health care management with other disciplines such as marketing, statistics, accounting, and microeconomics, the program gives students a strong foundation in management as it specifically relates to health care.

Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in all courses required for the major and minor (HCM and all required support courses) in order to progress through either program. Courses with grades of less than "C" must be repeated in order for the student to take any other courses for which the first course is a prerequisite.

Healthcare managers are employed in a variety of facilities and organizations: hospitals; nursing homes; health departments; educational institutions; health maintenance organizations; wellness programs; industrial health programs; the insurance industry; non-profit organizations, physician and dental practices; other types of medical corporations; and governmental agencies at local, state, and national levels.

A minor is required. The student selects a minor with approval of the faculty. Minors that complement the health care management major include, but are not limited to, Gerontology, Integrative Therapeutic Practices, Nutrition, Marketing, Information Systems, and Spanish, Students who are declared health care management majors and have an associate's degree in a health occupation may substitute up to 24 hours of selected, approved associate degree major courses in place of a minor.

Students who have attended the Paramedic School at the Denver Health Medical Center, obtained a Paramedic Certificate and received state licensure as a paramedic may use this in lieu of the minor.

The Health Care Management program is housed in the Health Professions Department. For more information call 303-556-3130.

Educational Goals and Outcomes

The baccalaureate health care management program has established the following student learning outcomes and organized them in six domains as follows:

  • Critical Thinking, Analysis and Synthesis ~ Understand cause and effect, view issues from different perspectives,examine quantitative data, understand scientific method, and apply concepts to new issues.
  • Knowledge of the Healthcare Environment - Evaluate global health systems and understand multiple interdependent components of the rapidly changing industry.
  • Business Knowledge and Skills - Apply knowledge of fundamental business operations (finance, accounting, marketing, economics, law, technology) to the management of health care.
  • Communication and Relationship Management - Demonstrate written and oral communication skills, demonstratethe ability to work effectively with others.
  • Professionalism and Leadership - Act in accordance with ethical and professional standards and apply management and leadership concepts for personal and business excellence.
  • Personal Growth and Development - Accept accountability of continued learning by acquiring knowledge, skills and abilities to meet the changing needs of self,client, management, and society.

Assessment Methodology

Assessment and measurement of student attainment of skills, knowledge and abilities in the six competency domains is done by faculty throughout the program. Student self-assessment of individual competencies is done at the beginning and the end of the program. In addition, students are asked to self-assess at the end of the internship experience. The internship preceptors conduct an assessment as well.

Student self-assessment of individual competencies is done at the beginning and the end of the program. In addition, students are asked to self-assess at the end of the internship experience. The internship preceptors conduct an assessment as well. Measurement and assessment of student attainment of skills, knowledge and abilities in the six competency domains is done by faculty throughout the program.

Health Education Services

This group of courses is designed to meet the special needs of non-health majors, as well as health majors.  An effort is made to provide students with content relevant to individual needs.  Students must consult a faculty advisor in the selection of appropriate General Studies courses.  See the Integrative Therapeutic Practices program for specifics about the major and minor in this area.

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Integrative Therapeutic Practices

The Integrative Therapeutic Practices program offers students courses that integrate the most recent scientific evidence with the oldest of healing traditions. The program draws from disciplines such as health education services, health care management, biology, chemistry, and nutrition. Students examine the diverse factors that impinge on an individual’s health and well-being. Students receive a broad-based understanding of the principles of human health and disease, the theories underlying healing practices, and the scientific research methods needed to evaluate the latest techniques in this dynamic field.

The Integrative Therapeutic Practices program offers a major, an extended major and a minor. The major and extended major are designed for students interested in working in the expanding complementary and alternative health care field. The minor is designed for students who recognize the increased emphasis on wellness in several professional fields and/or for health-conscious individuals who wish to establish a self-enhancement program. The minor can complement a major that is relevant to the student’s career goals.

Minors that would complement this major include, but are not limited to, Health Care Management, Nutrition, Gerontology, Recreation Services, Journalism, Spanish, Marketing, Human Services, Anthropology, Biology, and Chemistry.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses required for the major in order to progress through the program. Courses with grades of less than “C” must be repeated in order for the student to take any other courses for which the first course is a prerequisite. All general requirements of the College for a Bachelor of Science degree must be met prior to graduation.

In addition, students majoring in Integrative Therapeutic Practices must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and major GPA of 2.5. If either GPA falls below the minimum, one of the following will occur:

  • The student will be placed on academic probation and have one semester to bring the GPA(s) up to acceptable levels, while remaining in the course sequence.
  • If the student fails to bring the GPA(s) up to acceptable levels after one semester, the student will be suspended from the major until the minimum GPA(s) is/are achieved. Resumption in the Integrative Therapeutic Practices major will commence in the appropriate sequential semester.
  • If, after two semesters, the student does not bring the GPA(s) to acceptable levels, the student will be dismissed from the Integrative Therapeutic Practices major and advised to decide if they want to improve their GPA and re-apply for the Integrative Therapeutic Practices major or choose another major with different GPA expectations.
  • If the GPA(s) is/are raised to the minimum, the dismissal may be appealed.

Third- and fourth-year students will be notified of their status by June 1st of each year.

The Integrative Therapeutic Practices program is housed in the Health Professions Department. Students enrolling in the major or minor must confer with a department advisor as soon as possible. For more information, call 303-556-3130.

Educational Goals and Outcomes

The baccalaureate integrative therapeutic practices program has established the following outcomes for all graduates. The integrative therapeutic practices graduate will be prepared to:

  • Demonstrate an attitude of caring, flexibility, and self-confidence in a health care setting.
  • Act in an ethical and legal manner in applying the leadership roles of collaborator, resource person, change agent, teacher, and advocate.
  • Integrate a variety of communication skills, media techniques, and strategies effectively and appropriately to influence health.
  • Assess health situations and recommend appropriate healing practices.
  • Evaluate global health systems to identify social and health-care trends in order to anticipate the future of health care.
  • Apply scientific method to health-care problems.
  • Apply knowledge of natural science principles in a healing practice.

Recreation Professions

Students may select a major in Recreation Professions with a concentration in one of three areas: Recreation Management, Therapeutic Recreation Services, or Recreation Generalist. Since this is an extended major, no minor field of study is required. The Recreation Professions program is nationally accredited, meeting the standards set by the Council on Accreditation, National Recreation and Park Association. The Recreation Services Minor is an excellent complement to majors in Criminal Justice, Human Performance and Sport, Education, Human Services, Psychology, or Health Professions.

The Recreation Professions major prepares students with the knowledge and skills for employment in municipal, commercial/private, outdoor, clinical, military, campus, park, and not-for-profit settings. Job titles vary but include recreation director, aquatics specialist, recreational therapist, sports coordinator, facility manager, camp director,
resort manager, park ranger, youth recreation specialist, and armed forces recreation administrator, to name a few.

In conjunction with the core requirements, the student selects either the Recreation Management, Therapeutic Recreation Services, or Recreation Generalist concentration. The concentration provides the student with specific specialized knowledge and skills for employment and certification, Students passing the Therapeutic Recreation Services concentration meet eligibility requirements to sit for the national certification examination administered through the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (www.nctrc.org) and upon passing the test, become Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Upon graduation, all majors are eligible to sit for the national examination to become Certified Park and Recreation Professionals.

Nutrition

Human Nutrition - Dietetics

Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Human Nutrition - Dietetics will be prepared for traditional, non-traditional, and entrepreneurial positions in health care that utilize knowledge of nutrition. Professionals trained in nutrition have numerous career options due to the growing emphasis on nutrition, health and wellness.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses required for the major in order to progress through the program. Courses with grades less than “C” will need to be repeated in order for the student to take any other courses for which the first course is a prerequisite. All general requirements of the College for a Bachelor of Science degree must be met prior to graduation.

In addition, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and major GPA of 2.5. If either GPA falls below the minimum, one of the following will occur:

  • The student will be placed on academic probation and have one semester to bring the GPA(s) up to acceptable levels, while remaining in the course sequence.
  • If the student fails to bring the GPA(s) up to acceptable levels after one semester, the student will be suspended from the major until the minimum GPA(s) is/are achieved. Resumption in the Human Nutrition - Dietetics major will commence in the appropriate sequential semester.
  • If, after two semesters, the student does not bring the GPA(s) to acceptable levels, the student will be dismissed from the Human Nutrition - Dietetics major and advised to decide if they want to improve their GPA and re-apply for the Human Nutrition - Dietetics major or choose another major with different GPA expectations.
  • If the GPA(s) is/are raised to the minimum, the dismissal may be appealed.

Third- and fourth-year students will be notified of their status by June 1st of each year.

The Human Nutrition - Dietetics Major includes a didactic program in dietetics (DPD) which has been granted Candidacy for Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Dietetics Programs (CADE), 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312-899-0040 ext. 5400, cade@eatright.org. Students enrolled in the MSCD DPD program are considered students in a CADE accredited program.  Completion of a DPD program is one step required in the process for becoming a registered dietitian (RD).  To become a registered dietitian, students must also apply for and complete an accredited internship program and pass a national examination administered by the Commision on Dietetic Registration.

The Human Nutrition-Dietetics major is housed in the Health Professions Department, Nutrition Program.  Students enrolling in the major must confer with a department advisor as soon as possible.  For more information, call 303-556-3130.

Educational Goals and Outcomes

The baccalaureate degree in Human Nutrition - Dietetics has established the following outcomes for all graduates. The Human Nutrition–Dietetics graduate will be able to:

  1. Recognize disparities in health care and demonstrate cultural sensitivity.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of nutritional and sensory properties of foods.
  3. Effectively assess nutrition status, make a nutrition diagnosis, plan and implement effective intervention programs, and evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention.
  4. Discuss the role of nutrition.
  5. Apply nutrition principles and techniques in nutrition education and counseling.
  6. Demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills in the area of nutrition.
  7. Apply critical thinking and evidence-based analysis of research to nutrition problems.

Gerontology Programs

The purposes of the interdisciplinary gerontology programs are to provide an organized, systematic exploration of aging within society that enables students to develop beginning skills to effectively work directly or indirectly with older populations in a variety of settings; to cultivate a positive attitude toward aging; and to emphasize the dignity and worth of each individual. The programs in gerontology are administered by the Department of Health Professions, 303-556-3130.

Students have a variety of program options in Gerontology to select from: a certificate in Gerontology; a minor in Gerontology; and a major in Human Development (Applied Track Gerontology) or a major in Sociology (Gerontology Concentration) or a major in Social Work (Aging Concentration). In addition, students interested in Gerontology are advised by faculty to take courses related to Gerontology that meet their interests.

Students desiring or considering entry to any of the Gerontology programs need to seek academic advising from the Gerontology advisor in the Department of Health Professions. Students are responsible for keeping themselves informed of the latest program changes. Up-to-date program materials and requirements are available in the Department of Health Professions. Students seeking a major concentration in Gerontology should seek academic advising in one of the above major departments. Students must pass all courses in the gerontology program of choice with a grade of “C” or better.

Graduates in Gerontology are employed in a variety of facilities and organizations: community, human service, and religious organizations; exercise, fitness, mental health, acute health care, and long-term care institutions; federal, state, and local government agencies, including the aging network; retirement communities; academic and other educational and research settings; professional organizations; and business and industry.

Gerontology Certificate of Completion Program: See the gerontology advisor in the Department of Health Professions for information about the Gerontology Certificate of Completion.

Human Development Major with an Applied Track Gerontology Concentration: See the gerontology advisor in the Department of Psychology.

Sociology Major with a Gerontology Concentration: See an advisor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Behavioral Science for information on this program.

Social Work Major with an Aging Concentration: See an advisor in the Department of Social Work for information on his program.

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